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Thread: Treating mange in the wild

  1. #61
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    Default Re: Treating mange in the wild

    Thanks - I have purchased some Ivermectin 1.87 from Amazon.ca and have called a local vet. I hope to have the Ivermectin Friday. I am hoping the local vet will let me buy it so I have it today, unfortunately two of them that are in the office right now won't sell it unless you bring the animal in for weighing even though I told them it is a wild chipmunk and I told them I spoke with a rehabber and told them how much I was going to give - good grief! I am hoping the vet I know will be in later on and let me buy some. Like letting mange run through the wild animals is a better option, please, sigh.

  2. #62
    Sardoc Guest

    Default Re: Treating mange in the wild

    Is it possible to treat for mange (with ivermectin or anything else) if you are unable to pick out the affected critter? I live in Eastern NC, my backyard borders on woods and we have many squirrels that visit and get their food regularly. We have noticed a few with rather ugly looking patches on their sides and from what I have been able to research online, it appears to be mange. The treatment seems to be a very specific amount of ivermectin given several times over a month period of time. If you have many squirrels and no way to get the needed meds to the specific animal, can you put the medication on a larger amount of food that all will get? Thanks, Jeff (I am grasping at straws for a way to help my little friends)

  3. #63
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    Default Re: Treating mange in the wild

    Hi Jeff! I don't have an answer for you as medication goes right over my head. Just stopping by to say thank you for caring and I hope someone answers you soon!

  4. #64
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    Default Re: Treating mange in the wild

    Quote Originally Posted by Sardoc View Post
    Is it possible to treat for mange (with ivermectin or anything else) if you are unable to pick out the affected critter? I live in Eastern NC, my backyard borders on woods and we have many squirrels that visit and get their food regularly. We have noticed a few with rather ugly looking patches on their sides and from what I have been able to research online, it appears to be mange. The treatment seems to be a very specific amount of ivermectin given several times over a month period of time. If you have many squirrels and no way to get the needed meds to the specific animal, can you put the medication on a larger amount of food that all will get? Thanks, Jeff (I am grasping at straws for a way to help my little friends)
    Thank you for caring, Jeff.
    But no, you cannot do that.
    First off, for the medication - ivermectin - to be effective, it needs to be administered in a regular timed manner, otherwise - it will be useless.

    BUT most importantly, randomly putting nuts with ivermectin will literally result in fatalities. Ivermectin is very potent and extremely toxic - fatal - when overdosed. So, just putting out a bunch of nuts with ivermectin will result in several squirrels eating a few servings of ivermectin and it will be fatal.

    So, no, unless you can treat each squirrel individually, there is no way to treat them with ivermectin en masse.


    I may have missed when you explained it - but if these sqs are regular at your place, and/or regular at the park where you go, it is possible to treat each individually:
    1) Prep. as many nuts as there are sqs whom you want to treat;
    2) when they show up, give each nut to a specific squirrel, ensuring that no other squirrel, especially not the one who has already received his/her dose, can intercept it;
    3) repeat the same for three weeks (once a week).

    But if there is absolutely now way for you to treat them individually - just give them good food and support them that way. Mange is often caused by stress and weakened immune system, so boosting their immune system with good food can help. Good food will include good tree nuts - almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, even pecans (no cashews, no pistachios, no pine nuts), fruit (peeled apple, banana, watermelon, berries - rasp, blueb, strawb; mango pieces peeled), avocado meat - no skin and no pit b/c they are toxic, to name a few.
    You can also "doctor" rodent block to make it more palatable for the wilds.
    www.henryspets.com - they sell Wild Bites - nutritious block intended specifically for wild squirrels

    Although sometimes when mange has progressed too far, it will go away only with medication.

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  6. #65
    Join Date
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    Cool Re: Treating mange in the wild

    Quote Originally Posted by Vandercook View Post
    Thanks for the response. We will try to get some photographs of our squirrels to show what we think is mange. One black squirrel is missing an ear, it appears to have been scratched or rubbed off. There is a balding patch extending down behind his left ear, that looks like it's been chewed or nibbled. The little gray squirrel is developing baldness behind the head on his "shoulders" or the nape of his neck. I definitely will not proceed with any treatment without discussing it here. I am delighted to have joined this board! What a help. Thanks again. Will post here soon, tomorrow if I get a shot of the little guys. Thanks.
    Are you sure the fur loss is not the “landing strip” that gets produced by male squirrels in mating with females? Also, this time of year, pregnant females remove their “jackets” to line their breeding nests. When I first noticed it a couple years ago, I thought it was mange too, but I called Ministry of Natural Resources and found out that it likely wasn’t mange. The fur grew back as the year progressed, and I’ve seen the same pattern for several years now.
    Last edited by Gladbutterfly; 03-09-2020 at 11:35 AM. Reason: Grammar

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  8. #66
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    Default Re: Treating mange in the wild

    Glad butterfly, this is a very old thread...2016. Thank you for responding and to TSB.

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    RockyPops (03-11-2020)

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