Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Baylisascaris procyonis

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2023
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    2
    Thanked: 0

    Default Baylisascaris procyonis

    My squirrel friend "Little Fella" is displaying all the symptoms of the above ailment otherwise known as 'raccoon ringworm'. From what I've read it is fatal. Is that correct? If it is not fatal how can I help him? He lives in a pear tree in a neighboring yard. If it is fatal, how long will he live - symptoms became apparent 5 days ago? Should I call Animal Control and have him put down so other squirrels, dogs, etc. will not be infected? What precautions should I take for my own safety - he has put his paw on my hand a couple of times when I was feeding ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    20,176
    Thanked: 9564

    Default Re: Baylisascaris procyonis

    Quote Originally Posted by Tulsa Squirrel View Post
    My squirrel friend "Little Fella" is displaying all the symptoms of the above ailment otherwise known as 'raccoon ringworm'. From what I've read it is fatal. Is that correct? If it is not fatal how can I help him? He lives in a pear tree in a neighboring yard. If it is fatal, how long will he live - symptoms became apparent 5 days ago? Should I call Animal Control and have him put down so other squirrels, dogs, etc. will not be infected? What precautions should I take for my own safety - he has put his paw on my hand a couple of times when I was feeding ?
    Some life cycle info for you: https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/baylis...s/biology.html

    I would be vastly more concerned about the soil around your house than casual contact with the squirrel. IF this is Baylisascaris, you have raccoons around pooping it out into the soil and yard. I have a LOT of raccoons around because I live backed on a woods. Any time I am going to be near the soil - weeding, raking, ESPECIALLY leaf blowing, I wear one of my covid face masks. I can't NOT have it given the population, do I take precautions.

    When you say all the symptoms, what do you see? It is nearly impossible to tell the difference between raccoon roundworm (Baylisascaris) and having sustained a head injury of some kind. They can take a tumble in the trees (yes, they DO fall) and hit a limb on the way down. Sometimes, this will resolve itself with time.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2023
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    2
    Thanked: 0

    Default Re: Baylisascaris procyonis

    The observed symptoms are unsteadiness - wobbly - often tips over when he is on his haunches eating - and then continues eating on his side - often has unusual head tilt when he is reaching for a walnut piece that I hold out for him and he walks with his body at about a 45 degree slant - when he down at the base of a tree sniffing around and he mounts an exposed root he sometimes falls over. His body weight - seems a bit stout and maybe a bit overweight - though I don't this this particular aspect indicates ailment and I just mention it because if he had raccoon ringworm it seems to me he would be losing weight and appear malnourished.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    20,176
    Thanked: 9564

    Default Re: Baylisascaris procyonis

    Quote Originally Posted by Tulsa Squirrel View Post
    The observed symptoms are unsteadiness - wobbly - often tips over when he is on his haunches eating - and then continues eating on his side - often has unusual head tilt when he is reaching for a walnut piece that I hold out for him and he walks with his body at about a 45 degree slant - when he down at the base of a tree sniffing around and he mounts an exposed root he sometimes falls over. His body weight - seems a bit stout and maybe a bit overweight - though I don't this this particular aspect indicates ailment and I just mention it because if he had raccoon ringworm it seems to me he would be losing weight and appear malnourished.
    I would proceed as though he has head trauma if he was in my yard. If he was captive we would recommend a round of prednisone, because sometimes what you are seeing is the result of internal swelling from whatever trauma damaged them pressing on nerves it shouldn't be pressing on. Prednisone is a powerful anti inflammatory and will rapidly get rid of the swelling, sometimes allowing the neuro symptoms to subside. That said, I have had a few backyard squirrels that showed up looking just awful and had, over the months, a near full recovery to where I had great difficulty picking them out from the others.

    What I always try to do with the compromised ones, whether it is a neuro issue, injury, whatever, is try to stuff them full of food every time I see them. Like us, after a big meal they go home to sleep, which is the safest place for a compromised squirrel.

  5. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to CritterMom:

    TubeDriver (01-26-2023), Tulsa Squirrel (01-26-2023)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •