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Thread: Help for release. Squirrel sanctuary in NW Indiana to release this little sweetheart?

  1. #1
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    Default Help for release. Squirrel sanctuary in NW Indiana to release this little sweetheart?

    Little Squirreleee is so sweet, and loving, and personable. She's a singleton, rescued at only a week or so old. She knows nothing except her life with us... we've tried to abide by all the rules so that she's not overly domesticated, but she is just unbelievably sweet and social. We want to do a slow release, but we'd really like it to be at a sanctuary of sorts, or someone's yard who isn't going to move for many years, and has squirrel feeders. Preferably in NW Indiana so that we could be a part of the slow release, and maybe be able to visit/help supply food throughout the year. Anyone here who fits this description, perhaps? Or suggested "sanctuaries"?
    I just cannot imagine doing a slow release, she's ridiculously sweet (and sassy).

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Help for release. Squirrel sanctuary in NW Indiana to release this little sweethe

    Quote Originally Posted by Jesi View Post
    Little Squirreleee is so sweet, and loving, and personable. She's a singleton, rescued at only a week or so old. She knows nothing except her life with us... we've tried to abide by all the rules so that she's not overly domesticated, but she is just unbelievably sweet and social. We want to do a slow release, but we'd really like it to be at a sanctuary of sorts, or someone's yard who isn't going to move for many years, and has squirrel feeders. Preferably in NW Indiana so that we could be a part of the slow release, and maybe be able to visit/help supply food throughout the year. Anyone here who fits this description, perhaps? Or suggested "sanctuaries"?
    I just cannot imagine doing a slow release, she's ridiculously sweet (and sassy).
    Are there other reasons other than the last sentence above as to why you do not want to do a slow release where you live?

    Just know that no one will care for her as much as you do and no one has a good a relationship with her as you do.

    There are three parties to the slow release: you, the squirrel and the other wild animals in the vicinity. The slow release allows all three parties to adjust to the change and there is no set time table. The time table is ultimately dictated by the squirrel. Slow releases allows your squirrel to get to know the other wilds in a context where initially there cannot be any physical contact (thus no altercations reducing the chance of a hostile reception from the wilds.)

  3. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Rock Monkey from:

    Jesi (03-25-2021)

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Help for release. Squirrel sanctuary in NW Indiana to release this little sweethe

    Hi, after re-reading my last sentence, I realize it was a bit vague/misleading. I am 100% planning to do a slow release, but I just wanted it to be somewhere more suitable than my yard or the person's yard where she was found (where she was found has lots of stray cats and coyotes...she was actually all bloodied and scratched up pretty badly when found-- I suspect cats raided the nest).
    Of course, I'd 100% prefer for her release to be in my yard! I would prefer to keep an eye on her, and for her to have me as a support/backup, if needed (and I would be so very elated and honored if she wanted to keep a friendship with me after her release).
    As far as my own yard, here are my concerns (and maybe I'm just worrying too much?):
    1. Busy downtown area in mimi-metropolis, with constant traffic out front (there is a stop sign, so it's not high speed)
    2. A few apartments surrounding my house, meaning more humans. She is so friendly and unafraid (even though we have kept her human contact to just my daughter and myself, she gets very excited about other humans saying hi to her in her den... she even shows off for them).
    3 Her favorite thing to do with me is climb up and around on my body... which would freak a stranger out, and perhaps get her reported as a nuisance.
    4. There are some unresolved, mystery plumbing issues in my very small back yard, which will require the city to bring in large diggers and make lots of noise for a prolonged period of time (once they even figure out the problem).
    5. Minimal trees in the area, most of which are more ornamental. There are a few shrubs. Nothing is reliable because it seems this area of downtown is under development... we've already lost two of the most perfect giant pine trees across our parking lot because the owners of that business wanted to redo their parking lot. Very upsetting.
    6. Also, we might be moving next year, so I want her to have a reliable, forever home (yard) where she will have sqirrel feeders to supplement if she's not able to find enough food on her own.

    So, am I overthinking this?
    She's just soooooo sweet! I want the best for her that I can offer.

    Thanks for reading all of this!

  5. #4
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    Default Re: Help for release. Squirrel sanctuary in NW Indiana to release this little sweethe

    I totally understand you being protective and worrying about everything. That reflects how much you care about her.

    One good measure of how good place is for squirrels is how many of them are found in that area. In most areas there are pluses and minuses. If there are a lot of squirrels where you live the good likely significantly outweighs the bad. For example, maybe there are a lot of bird feeders where food gets knocked on the ground. Maybe there are trash cans that can be raided. Reliable sources of food are priceless.

    Many squirrels die every year because the food found in nature, particularly nuts, has lean years and plentiful years. For example, I haven't had more than a pound or two pecans from my huge, ancient trees in more than four years. Some years I have gotten something close to 100 lbs. In these lean years they are much more vulnerable to cold and disease. There offspring are less likely to survive the first year.

    In the week or two that she will spend in her slow release cage in the backyard, her wild, genetically wired instincts will become stronger and stronger. She will become more and more wary of people. Partly she will be observing the behavior of squirrels and animals and take her cues from that. The nearby animals also get to know her slowly so she won't be some stranger when the slow release enclosure is finally opened.

    Where you live, where do the squirrels live?

    Do you see many animals that have been hit by cars? (With squirrels it is mostly the males running towards females in heat that get hit by cars.)

    The presence of humans can sometimes mean that there will be fewer of certain predators.

    If there are not a ton of trees nearby, you can buy her or build her a nice house for squirrels and put it high up, preferably in a tree that connects to other trees and or structures. The wise squirrels minimizes the amount of time spent on the ground, going from fence to hedge to tree to roof, etc.

  6. 3 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Rock Monkey:

    Buddy (03-26-2021), Diggie's Friend (03-29-2021), Jesi (03-26-2021)

  7. #5
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    Default Re: Help for release. Squirrel sanctuary in NW Indiana to release this little sweethe

    Thank you, those are great things to consider and observe. There are a few squirrels around my house, but truly just a few each season. And I've never seen any animals killed in the road out front, so that's a little bit of a consolation. There are two tall trees at the property line that I could put a box in, I just feel like everything is temporary here, and could be cut down at any point without a notice... it's unnerving as a "squirrel mom". I'm going to take a "squirrel walk " this weekend... scout out how many wilds I see, and possible resources for my little sweetheart.

  8. 3 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Jesi:

    Buddy (03-26-2021), Mel1959 (03-26-2021), Rock Monkey (03-27-2021)

  9. #6
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    Default Re: Help for release. Squirrel sanctuary in NW Indiana to release this little sweethe

    Quote Originally Posted by Jesi View Post
    There are two tall trees at the property line that I could put a box in, I just feel like everything is temporary here, and could be cut down at any point without a notice... it's unnerving as a "squirrel mom".
    Squirrels always have multiple nests, 3 or 4 in total, in case one blows down in a storm or a predator is hanging out near one and probably even a summer nest and a winter nest. It takes them a few hours to build a drey.

    I spend a lot of times in various large parks and it is always striking to me that I don't see many squirrels. Now, they may be keeping a low profile since humans are an unknown quantity to them, unlike those squirrels that live in the suburbs, but I think the suburbs provide more reliable food year round and year after year. Suburbs also provide mowed lawns where a squirrel can run quickly and see what is on the ground. There are also lots of birds in suburbia and song birds give warning calls when they see predators and if a squirrel hears this warning they know that they need to be very careful.

    Nobody will be as a vigilant observer of your squirrel as you will be. Nobody has a better relationship and trust than you do with her.

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