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Thread: Spinach good or bad

  1. #1
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    Default Spinach good or bad

    Someone told me spinach is bad for gray's but it's one of the only vegetables she will eat.
    Is it good or bad?

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    Default Re: Spinach good or bad

    Quote Originally Posted by bednarkim77 View Post
    Someone told me spinach is bad for gray's but it's one of the only vegetables she will eat.
    Is it good or bad?
    Both. Spinach has lots of calcium, which is good, but also tons of oxalic acid, which is bad (hard on the kidneys). I do not feed it for this reason. Kale is similar with the calcium but much lower in oxalic acid. Some of the baby lettuces that are sold in spring mixes may fill the bill for her too. But read the label because lots of them have tons of baby spinach in them.

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  4. #3
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    Default Re: Spinach good or bad

    Thank you.
    She loves the spring mixes but it's hard to find some with out lots of spinach in it.
    She hates kale and she is such a picky girl . I have struggled for 5 years getting her to eat good.
    Now she has MBD (she is much better now).
    I wish there was a veggie high with vitamin D and C that she would eat.

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    Default Re: Spinach good or bad

    Try organic Kale, it is also liked by squirrels. https://www.earthboundfarm.com/produ...-organic-kale/

    Higher in calcium and low in oxalic acid; organic lower than conventional produced greens in oxalic acid content.

    Oxalic acid readily bonds with calcium carbonate in the intestines into a form that the body isn't able to utilize for the bones and cells.

    Flash freezing increases digestibility of greens as does blanching 90's sec. making more of the calcium it contains available to be used by the body.

    Frozen then cooked greens are higher in calcium than fresh cooked.

    Frozen eliminates waste. This handy dandy tea strainer makes the process of making this daily a breeze!

    https://www.amazon.com/VAHDAM-Infuse...kle_mcd_asin_0
    Last edited by TubeDriver; 10-21-2020 at 10:41 AM.

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    Default Re: Spinach good or bad

    Wow great information thank you so much!

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  9. #6
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    Question Re: Spinach good or bad

    Immature leafy greens which are higher in calcium than oxalic acidic include: Japanese Mustard spinach (related to turnips not spinaches), lettuces, endives, escarole, radicchio, Bok Choy, Pak Choy, arugula, mizuna and other Asian cabbages.

    When boiled the oxalic acid levels of these vegetable sources are reduced and the availability of their calcium increased to the body: headed cabbages, florets of broccoli & cauliflower, green beans, sugar snap peas, snow peas, asparagus tips (buds), kohlrabi, green peas, carrots, parsnips, turnips, rutabagas.

    Leafy green and vegetables sources with a greater than (2:1) ratio of oxalic acid to calcium that provide nil available calcium to the bones, also was found in rats to lower calcium availability in other foods that are consumed with spinach, lowering it by 41% in rats. These sources, some found in the grocery section of markets, and other commonly found edible weeds, include: (Purslane, Lamb's quarters, Chards, Beet Leaves and roots, Rhubarbs, Amaranth leaves, Sorrels, Pigweed, clovers, and true spinach varieties, teas).

    Oxalic acid decreases calcium absorption in rats

    C M Weaver 1 , B R Martin, J S Ebner, C A Krueger (1987)

    Calcium bioavailability was nearly 10 times greater for low oxalate kale, CaCO3 (Calcium carbonate) and CaCl2 (Calcium chloride)

    than from CaC2O4 (calcium oxalate) and spinach (high in oxalates).

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