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Thread: NR squirrels and eating rollie pollies....

  1. #1
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    Default NR squirrels and eating rollie pollies....

    I know...kinda gross. My guy just ate a rollie pollie bug. Should I be worried? Please advise....thanks!!!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: NR squirrels and eating rollie pollies....

    Quote Originally Posted by strdsk View Post
    I know...kinda gross. My guy just ate a rollie pollie bug. Should I be worried? Please advise....thanks!!!
    No, not at all.. woodlouse are common part of a squirrel's diet and a great source for calcium. Rollie pollie's are very similar to woodlouse so I assume all the same holds true...


  3. #3
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    Default Re: NR squirrels and eating rollie pollies....

    Wild Gray squirrels in the fall have been observed consuming a fair amount of woodlice, that go by many names, including, sow bugs, pill bugs, rolly pollies, etc. Yet these bugs aren't lice orinsects or, but ignominious terrestrial crustaceans which consume and recycle decaying plant material abundant in the fall, all of which contains high levels of calcium, some of which they retain and some of which they contribute to the growth of trees and other plant forms. Unsurprisingly, the exoskeleton (carapace) of woodlice has been found to contain 24% Calcium carbonate.

    Their gut on the other hand has been found to store various heavy metals; how much depends upon whether their habitats are pristine, a dump, or somewhere in between. Gardens and backyards not treated with herbicides and pesticides make this bug a good choice for wilds and even pets in the fall; still it's best to address potential gut parasites and toxins not just in wild sourced bugs, but also those found to be contained in commercial rodent chow sources also.

    https://www.amazon.com/Oregons-Wild-...9952033&sr=8-9

    This same company also offers MTS liquid Elixer by itself. MTS is a known chelator (remover) of heavy metals, pesticides, GMO and other toxic compounds found in food sources, and from exposure to the enviroment also. (1 needle drop) using a (1 cc / 1 ml) syringe daily.

    https://www.amazon.com/Healthy-Orgin.../dp/B00CLYNA14

    Pycnogenol (from the cambium living layer of tree bark of the (Pinaster Pine), among its powerful health promoting properties, it also contains tannins that takes the place of wild food tree sources of inner tree bark and acorns, which act as natural deworming compounds.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: NR squirrels and eating rollie pollies....

    This is all very good to know....thanks! But he never eats bugs. This was a one off happening in the 7 months I've had him. Do you think it's still needed to deworm him now? Thanks!!






    Quote Originally Posted by Diggie's Friend View Post
    Wild Gray squirrels in the fall have been observed consuming a fair amount of woodlice, that go by many names, including, sow bugs, pill bugs, rolly pollies, etc. Yet these bugs aren't lice orinsects or, but ignominious terrestrial crustaceans which consume and recycle decaying plant material abundant in the fall, all of which contains high levels of calcium, some of which they retain and some of which they contribute to the growth of trees and other plant forms. Unsurprisingly, the exoskeleton (carapace) of woodlice has been found to contain 24% Calcium carbonate.

    Their gut on the other hand has been found to store various heavy metals; how much depends upon whether their habitats are pristine, a dump, or somewhere in between. Gardens and backyards not treated with herbicides and pesticides make this bug a good choice for wilds and even pets in the fall; still it's best to address potential gut parasites and toxins not just in wild sourced bugs, but also those found to be contained in commercial rodent chow sources also.

    https://www.amazon.com/Oregons-Wild-...9952033&sr=8-9

    This same company also offers MTS liquid Elixer by itself. MTS is a known chelator (remover) of heavy metals, pesticides, GMO and other toxic compounds found in food sources, and from exposure to the enviroment also. (1 needle drop) using a (1 cc / 1 ml) syringe daily.

    https://www.amazon.com/Healthy-Orgin.../dp/B00CLYNA14

    Pycnogenol (from the cambium living layer of tree bark of the (Pinaster Pine), among its powerful health promoting properties, it also contains tannins that takes the place of wild food tree sources of inner tree bark and acorns, which act as natural deworming compounds.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: NR squirrels and eating rollie pollies....

    So far what I found on potential parasites in woodlice, is that some flies lay their eggs in them; yet I wouldn't assume that would be a concern as those aren't the intestinal worms found in the insects which when consumed can be transferred to rodents.
    If I find a notation of specific endoparasites in woodlice I will let you know.

    Adding "Pycnogenol" to the diet can't hurt as it isn't a med like ivermectin, but a nutraceutical. Among its many health protecting and promoting properties, PYC was found to increase calcium bone density in rats; a definite plus making it worth including in the diet on that account alone.

    Berries, which also are a good source of tannins, are noted to be consumed by tree squirrels 2nd in proportion to nuts and seed sources in the wild.

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