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Thread: PYOMETRA

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  1. #1
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    Default PYOMETRA

    I took Rosie to the vet today because she in my opinion has been in heat for too long and she was still swollen. There are no changes in her activity or eating habits, she's happy-go-lucky, active good appetite. The vet that examined her thinks she may have pyometra and has been put on Baytril twice a day and it is suggested she be spayed. I guess my question would be is this common for a squirrel, is it something I need to worry about, is it possible she does have this, and also how necessary or how dangerous could it be to have her spayed
    To all my babies past and present..
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: PYOMETRA

    I know nothing about this condition but I do know there are folks on here that have had their female squirrels spayed for medical reasons. I think the most important aspect of surgery for a squirrel is the competence of the vet regarding anesthesia as well as familiarity with squirrels.

    Dr. Alicia Emerson in Port Orange, Fl, is one of the best squirrel vets in the country. She has been known to confer with other vets regarding squirrels. If you’d like to reach out to her her office number is 386-788-1550.

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  4. #3
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    Default Re: PYOMETRA

    The vet did mention caution with different types if sedation. She works with wildlife and from what I'm told she knows squirrels.
    To all my babies past and present..
    Thank you for showing me how to love
    and be loved unconditionally....
    RIP Timothy

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  6. #4
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    Default Re: PYOMETRA

    Recently a member of the board contacted me in regard to their female having developed a case of vaginitis with an open uterus presenting with swelling and a creamy white discharge. Though the heat has to run it's course, the swelling was not abating. In using the following protocol this condition was resolved in this squirrel.

    In having addressed this same condition in our female in the past with AB. it was not found to be effective in addressing the infection during her heats save for it going septic, and did not result in it from re-occurring with each heat.

    That said, when the uterus is closed pyometra that becomes a life threatening condition.

    http://ratguide.com/health/reproductive/pyometra.php

    It is note worthy that the use of AB is listed as one of the causes of the development of vaginitis during heats.

    https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.co...ding_911df0-ae
    pyometra.php

    Antibiotic or steroid use that interferes with the normal balance of bacteria in the reproductive tract
    For this reason, short of an infection in a closed uterus, the first and best line of defense for vaginitis in an open uterus where a creamy white discharge is observed, is pre/probiotics with polyphenols to address vaginitis,

    Giving Lactobacillus Casei after AB treatment was found to slow recovery. In addition, some animals are senstive to dairy, resulting in bloating not resolution of vaginitis. Soil based gut flora is like upon that squirrels have in the wild, not dairy, so it is the first line of defense that works with their natural diet, the dairy is secondary and can cause bloating in some animals that are sensitive to it.

    Soil based pre + probiotics along with two powerful sources of polyphenol (Pycnogenol and Milk Thistle seed), do much more than the probiotics alone to counter vaginitis.

    https://www.amazon.com/Vitality-Scie...8838421&sr=8-2

    Pycnogenol is well tolerated in rats; researched over 50 years in over 100 studies many of them in rats, PYC was found to be low in toxicity above 500 to 1000 mg. It is an extract of the cambium layer of the Pinaster (maritime) pine. Though the highest dosage i have seen noted, 150 mg. for cardiomyopathy, for supporting the balanced gut biome much lower would be advisable, for high levels of tannins can disrupt digestion. Om this balance is the key in overcoming and preventing vaginitis.

    For adult squirrel for maintenance, one eighth portion of one capsule daily divided dosed split between the AM and PM meal.

    https://www.amazon.com/Healthy-Orgin...grocery&sr=8-4

    For adult squirrels for maintenance, include MTS (organic) liquid, include 1 needle drop from a 1 cc ml syringe into the food daily, and 2 needle drops for toxins. Beyond this, you would need to consult with your Vet for greater than 2 needle drops from this source.

    Adding these to a small measure of the organic plain lowfat yogurt (1/2 to 1 Tsp. twice daily.)

    Adding this organic low alcohol source of vanilla extract to cover the taste that will be new to a squirrel would be advisable, for the MTS doesn't taste good, and PYC may put a squirrel off accepting it initially. 1 drop this vanilla extract into 1 to 2 Tsp. of the organic plain low fat yogurt daily.

    https://www.amazon.com/Simply-Organi.../dp/B0002UN7PI

    With spaying, calcium in the diet has to be raised to counter the severe drop in the absorption level of calcium into the bloodstream from the drop in estrogen. It is hard to say how much would be needed to raise the calcium, yet Vit. D3 should not be raised as doing this in rats has been found to result in the development of kidney stones. Yet having seen the result of spaying our girl, which even with her diet then fortified with three separate sources of calcium, it still resulted in the development of the destabilization of her spine which that resulted in painful spasms due to the drop in estrogen from spaying. Then in two more years she reached advanced MBD.

    It is hard then to say how much calcium would be needed to prevent this condition. in human women what is available only slows it from happening using a source (CCM) that is bad tasting, which is why it is best taken by capsule, whichisn't doable of course for rodents. With this, Vit. D3 should not be raised as doing this in rats has been found to result in the development of kidney stones.

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  8. #5
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    Default Re: PYOMETRA

    I'm not sure I understand all that you posted. Are you saying ABwill make her worse? During her heat I didn't see that her vaginal area was open just swollen. And should she be spayed are you saying she needs added calcium?
    To all my babies past and present..
    Thank you for showing me how to love
    and be loved unconditionally....
    RIP Timothy

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  10. #6
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    Default Re: PYOMETRA

    This is Rosie about 3 weeks into heat. As you can see she's still swollen yet closed. I checked her daily and never saw her open, just swollen. And when I felt around her area I could feel hard swelling inside her. That's her uterus. She didn't have any discharge , or smell nor was she open at any time.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    To all my babies past and present..
    Thank you for showing me how to love
    and be loved unconditionally....
    RIP Timothy

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  12. #7
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    Default Re: PYOMETRA

    Quote Originally Posted by Mel1959 View Post
    I know nothing about this condition but I do know there are folks on here that have had their female squirrels spayed for medical reasons. I think the most important aspect of surgery for a squirrel is the competence of the vet regarding anesthesia as well as familiarity with squirrels.

    Dr. Alicia Emerson in Port Orange, Fl, is one of the best squirrel vets in the country. She has been known to confer with other vets regarding squirrels. If you’d like to reach out to her her office number is 386-788-1550.

  13. #8
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    Default Re: PYOMETRA

    Rosie has recovered completely from her spay. She's the same doughty feisty girl she was before she was ill.
    To all my babies past and present..
    Thank you for showing me how to love
    and be loved unconditionally....
    RIP Timothy

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  15. #9
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    Default Re: PYOMETRA

    So very happy for you and your Rosie that she has fully recovered and is back to her former spry self!

    Don't forget that with the drop in estrogen will significantly lower the uptake of calcium from from her diet. To compensate for this drop, lowering the ration of HHB block from 2 blocks a day to (1 1/2) blocks, and replacing the calcium reduction from the 1/2 block removed with Calcium citrate that supports the kidneys is optimum for older squirrels as well as spayed squirrels of any age. From NOW Calcium citrate label noting 600 mg. for humans, for this purpose, add these measures (1/8 + 1/32 + 1/64) Tsp. each split in half (1/16 + 1/32 + 1/128 Tsp.)t o yogurt one half in each to both the AM and PM meals.

    If you were only to get just one of the nutraceuticals, Pycnogenol is the best overall source for health, as it was found to support the organs. blood vessels, and lends more support to bone density than from the diet alone in rodents.

    https://thesquirrelboard.com/forums/...12#post1315212

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