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Thread: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

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    Default Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    Is anyone able to help with a diabetic squirrel? I have no access to a vet, so can't get drugs. Can I get it under control with just diet?

    She is 2 1/2.
    Little back leg movement from previous MBD.
    Her glucose level is as high as the test strip measures - 2000.
    Ketones have been normal on each test so I'm assuming type 2, but not sure. Can I find out?
    We've taken all fruit from her diet and I've got familiar with the GI index.
    I'm trying to increase her level of activity, but difficult as she can't bound about.
    She's lost 22g in 3 days, not tested her urine for 2 days as I know it'll take a long time to get from 2000 to 1000 so test won't show a difference.
    Was going to put up a video but can't see how to do it if it isn't on YouTube, which I don't do.
    TIA

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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    Correcting the diet is a process that takes time to support. In my posts you will read about a number of nutraceuticals sources and foods I recommend to support squirrels health for maintenance, but also those with specific ill health conditions like elevated blood sugar diabetes, and related dietary related disorders. I read that your squirrel is losing weight, so in that regard you have already taken the first step towards improving the health of your squirrel.

    One of the nutraceuticals I recommend be added to the diet of tree squirrels, is, "Pycnogenol"; this source has been organically produced with no pesticides from the, 'cambium' inner living layer of the bark of the, "Pinaster 'Maritime' Pine". Notably high in polyphenols, found to be non toxic in rats even at higher levels of dosage, this source has been studied in over 100 studies done over 50 years. Amongst the many health benefits this source has been found to have in humans and in rodents, was to improve Cholesterol levels, reduce inflammation due to cardiovascular disease, and improve and stabilize blood sugar in diabetic rats.

    http://abc.herbalgram.org/site/DocSe...pdf?docID=8983

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00CLYNA14/ref=dp_cerb_3

    Recommend you begin by including:1/8 part of the total powder in one capsule daily.

    Organic (food grade) Chia oil from "Foods Alive; include: (2 drops) daily one each per meal

    https://foodsalive.com/products/orga...il-foods-alive

    Organic Milk Thistle Seed Elixir from, "Oregon Wild Harvest". This lends protection and support to removing toxins in the liver. You will need a 1 cc needle syringe to deliver the daily dose of: 1 drop daily to the diet.

    https://www.amazon.com/Oregons-Wild-.../dp/B00J9MKEUG

    I will check back tomorrow as to questions you may have on this information.
    Last edited by island rehabber; 01-15-2020 at 07:23 AM.

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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    Quote Originally Posted by Diggie's Friend View Post
    Correcting the diet is a process that takes time to support. In my posts you will read about a number of nutraceuticals sources and foods I recommend to support squirrels health for maintenance, but also those with specific ill health conditions like elevated blood sugar diabetes, and related dietary related disorders. I read that your squirrel is losing weight, so in that regard you have already taken the first step towards improving the health of your squirrel.

    One of the nutraceuticals I recommend be added to the diet of tree squirrels, is, "Pycnogenol"; this source has been organically produced with no pesticides from the, 'cambium' inner living layer of the bark of the, "Pinaster 'Maritime' Pine". Notably high in polyphenols, found to be non toxic in rats even at higher levels of dosage, this source has been studied in over 100 studies done over 50 years. Amongst the many health benefits this source has been found to have in humans and in rodents, was to improve Cholesterol levels, reduce inflammation due to cardiovascular disease, and improve and stabilize blood sugar in diabetic rats.

    http://abc.herbalgram.org/site/DocSe...pdf?docID=8983

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00CLYNA14/ref=dp_cerb_3

    Recommend you begin by including:1/8 part of the total powder in one capsule daily.

    Organic (food grade) Chia oil from "Foods Alive; include: (2 drops) daily one each per meal

    https://foodsalive.com/products/orga...il-foods-alive

    Organic Milk Thistle Seed Elixir from, "Oregon Wild Harvest". This lends protection and support to removing toxins in the liver. You will need a 1 cc needle syringe to deliver the daily dose of: 1 drop daily to the diet.

    https://www.amazon.com/Oregons-Wild-.../dp/B00J9MKEUG

    I will check back tomorrow as to questions you may have on this information.
    Thank you Diggie's Friend, that's a lot to take in. I'm in the UK so not sure what's available to me. I should be able to spend a chunk of time tomorrow on this. For now I do have milk thistle liquid, which we used to support one of our rescue parrot's liver, but not sure whether the strengths are the same, and therefore the dose, I'll look into that too. Not sure how to make this palatable though - it's the vilest thing on the planet. Our avian vet said it was more effective if mixed with lactulose, but don't know if that's just in birds.
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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    What I know for sure is available is Pycnogenol, as it's sold from the UK to the US.

    As for the monograph, it's just for a reference, you don't need to memorize it.

    You see you aren't the first person that has had this problem with diabetes.

    How much does your squirrel weigh?

    What is her diet look like besides no fruit; do you include Rodent block?

    Let me consult my friend whose a Vet and get back on the reading.

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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    The milk Thistle seed extract you have is twice the potency for the dose. To dilute it use purified water, as tap contains chlorine. Use no more than 1/32 Tsp. to add a single needle drop of this source to; then stir it in a small plastic container. From there pull up the entire amount, but only push out a quarter of the amount into the low fat yogurt. If you squirrel hasn't lost too much weight the get the low fat plain yogurt from "Stonyfield" if available instead. If this source isn't available be sure you still get organic, no sugars added, no fruit in the bottom as it is high in sugars, nor artificial sugars which are the worst of all as they are highly acidic.

    Not sure if you can get Stonyfield low fat plain organic yogurt that is very low in sugars, with no sugars or artificial sugars added, the latter of which is toxic and will increase diabetes as it is also highly acidic. To enhance the flavor you can add one drop of organic vanilla extract per yogurt feeding that is per meal. If you don't have this yogurt available where you are, let me know what low fat plain yogurt preferably organic, you do have.

    https://www.stonyfield.com/products/...fat-plain-32oz

    https://www.amazon.com/Simply-Organi.../dp/B0002UN7PI


    Diabetes is caused by a diet that is highly acidic promoted by too high fats, protein, carbs from acidic sources like nuts, seeds; but also from sweetened foods, fried foods, and highly process foods that should not be fed to tree squirrels. Nuts can be fed limitedly when there is no MBD, or diabetes when concurrently feeding a block diet.

    To determine the ph. of the diet, taking a set of threee readings at least 1 hour after meals. Then the next day take one reading prior to the first meal of the next day; best from the first urine of the day. Then add up the reading values and divide by the number of readings that is four to get the mean urine (ph.) for the diet.

    The normal mean urine ph. range is 6.0 t 6.9 preferably 6.4 to 6.9. Abnormal is anything below or above this range. Lowering nuts and removing all seeds while increasing tree fruits in the diet is needful. Do not feed any sources with sugar or salt added, only naturally occurring sugars as is found in unsweetened plain organic yogurt.

    Do you have testing strips, if not you can get a bottle of them from UK Amazon.com, and perhaps at local drug store. Getting the multi test strips would be advantageous with having a squirrel in any case. There are those here that can help interpret the readings if you post them here.

    If the urine is alkaline that would indicate with diabetes that there is also an infection. This is commonly seen with UTI, but can also be from Kidney infection from kidney stones. Without an x-ray it is hard to say save urination is fitful or strained to do.

    Catching the urine can be tricky, so if there is a corner your squirrel pees in put some wax paper to collect it. Be sure you do the test immediately not waiting for when the urine cools it will increase in bacteria and change ph. It is the sugars in dairy and grains and potatoes and yams that support too high phosphorus in the diet, and too many nuts and seeds that support too high fats.

    If you are present feeding potatoes of any kind including sweet potatoes or yams stop doing so and change to organic baked winter squash instead. Acorn or Butternut squash, even pumpkin will do, that you want to fully bake, cool sufficiently and emove the seeds and mash before feeding the flesh. You will want to store it once baked and cooled in the freezer; putting a measure portion into the dimples of a silicone ice baby food tray is ideal, as then you can pop one out and put the rest back into the freezer. With one portion should be at least 1 Tsp. of the baked squash; place it into the refrigerator overnight to thaw, then take it out in the morning prior to feeding to warm up a bit more, but d not microwave it. Use have the amount to feed AM and then again PM.

    Calcium citrate is a source I recommend for metabolic disorders including MBD and diabetes. Why is for reason that with a diet high in acidity ph. below 6.0 which promotes diabetes, also promotes calcium oxalate kidney stones. Also it can promote bladder sludge. UTI also are promoted by a diet that produces acidic urine. Both are highly problematic when it comes to supporting long term health it is needful to prevent these conditions from occurring by supporting a diet that promotes mid 6 mean urine ph.

    Please understand without a history that can take many posts, I want to give you here what you need to support turning this condition around if at all possible. Just being thorough as I can as to not forget anything. If you have more questions please ask them here save it is something you don't wanted publically posted. In that case let me know here and I will send you a PM so you can share what you desire off the open board.

    I will fill you in more on the rest of the diet when I hear back what you are presently feeding. Take care, DF

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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    Sorry I mentioned the testing strips; I usually include this info on with my posts on diet by way of habit.

    I admit though, that after a couple hours into formatting this post with links and all that I forgot you had.

    I don't do interpretation of readings, save what the testing strips I have note as abnormal, and urine ph. of course.

    I have a friend that is a vet that does; I'll ask them if they have time to look at the readings you have gotten.

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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    Apologies if I missed something significant as I read the first post, but not every reply.

    I believe that diabetes is sometimes, maybe even often, reversible or at least treatable with proper diet and exercise. The difficulty may be getting the squirrel to eat the proper diet (like people, junk food usually tastes better), and depending upon your level of experience, possibly learning what an ideal diet is. Maybe there is someone on here with a menu for diabetic squirrels who is willing to share (and advise about preparation)?
    . And advice for exercise, maybe a large hamster wheel?

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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    What was shared with another member with a squirrel that was found to have high blood sugar levels, in regard to supportive dietary changes, lent support to their squirrel recovering from diabetes. There is hope that this squirrel will recover also.

    I miss things to at times too!. With, "Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel", this particular squirrel isn't able to have the support of an exercise wheel, but must rely upon a reduced calorie diet, supporting the optimum mean urine ph. and providing a healthy calcium to phosphorus ratio also. Add to this the support of these nutraceuticals (natural extracts that act much like drugs, save for negative side effects they lack when given appropriate doses. And though drugs are vital in addressing many ill health conditions and diseases, nutraceuticals work well to help to prevent and reduce the severity of diet related ill health conditions, as well as improve the damage to organs as to improve and lengthen their function.

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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    The same dietary protocols that have lent support to preventing ill health conditions, also helps to improve them.

    https://thesquirrelboard.com/forums/...90#post1307890

    As for a block diet, Henry's is the best available!

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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    Quote Originally Posted by Diggie's Friend View Post
    The milk Thistle seed extract you have is twice the potency for the dose. To dilute it use purified water, as tap contains chlorine. Use no more than 1/32 Tsp. to add a single needle drop of this source to; then stir it in a small plastic container. From there pull up the entire amount, but only push out a quarter of the amount into the low fat yogurt. If you squirrel hasn't lost too much weight the get the low fat plain yogurt from "Stonyfield" if available instead. If this source isn't available be sure you still get organic, no sugars added, no fruit in the bottom as it is high in sugars, nor artificial sugars which are the worst of all as they are highly acidic.

    Not sure if you can get Stonyfield low fat plain organic yogurt that is very low in sugars, with no sugars or artificial sugars added, the latter of which is toxic and will increase diabetes as it is also highly acidic. To enhance the flavor you can add one drop of organic vanilla extract per yogurt feeding that is per meal. If you don't have this yogurt available where you are, let me know what low fat plain yogurt preferably organic, you do have.

    https://www.stonyfield.com/products/...fat-plain-32oz

    https://www.amazon.com/Simply-Organi.../dp/B0002UN7PI


    Diabetes is caused by a diet that is highly acidic promoted by too high fats, protein, carbs from acidic sources like nuts, seeds; but also from sweetened foods, fried foods, and highly process foods that should not be fed to tree squirrels. Nuts can be fed limitedly when there is no MBD, or diabetes when concurrently feeding a block diet.

    To determine the ph. of the diet, taking a set of threee readings at least 1 hour after meals. Then the next day take one reading prior to the first meal of the next day; best from the first urine of the day. Then add up the reading values and divide by the number of readings that is four to get the mean urine (ph.) for the diet.

    The normal mean urine ph. range is 6.0 t 6.9 preferably 6.4 to 6.9. Abnormal is anything below or above this range. Lowering nuts and removing all seeds while increasing tree fruits in the diet is needful. Do not feed any sources with sugar or salt added, only naturally occurring sugars as is found in unsweetened plain organic yogurt.

    Do you have testing strips, if not you can get a bottle of them from UK Amazon.com, and perhaps at local drug store. Getting the multi test strips would be advantageous with having a squirrel in any case. There are those here that can help interpret the readings if you post them here.

    If the urine is alkaline that would indicate with diabetes that there is also an infection. This is commonly seen with UTI, but can also be from Kidney infection from kidney stones. Without an x-ray it is hard to say save urination is fitful or strained to do.

    Catching the urine can be tricky, so if there is a corner your squirrel pees in put some wax paper to collect it. Be sure you do the test immediately not waiting for when the urine cools it will increase in bacteria and change ph. It is the sugars in dairy and grains and potatoes and yams that support too high phosphorus in the diet, and too many nuts and seeds that support too high fats.

    If you are present feeding potatoes of any kind including sweet potatoes or yams stop doing so and change to organic baked winter squash instead. Acorn or Butternut squash, even pumpkin will do, that you want to fully bake, cool sufficiently and emove the seeds and mash before feeding the flesh. You will want to store it once baked and cooled in the freezer; putting a measure portion into the dimples of a silicone ice baby food tray is ideal, as then you can pop one out and put the rest back into the freezer. With one portion should be at least 1 Tsp. of the baked squash; place it into the refrigerator overnight to thaw, then take it out in the morning prior to feeding to warm up a bit more, but d not microwave it. Use have the amount to feed AM and then again PM.

    Calcium citrate is a source I recommend for metabolic disorders including MBD and diabetes. Why is for reason that with a diet high in acidity ph. below 6.0 which promotes diabetes, also promotes calcium oxalate kidney stones. Also it can promote bladder sludge. UTI also are promoted by a diet that produces acidic urine. Both are highly problematic when it comes to supporting long term health it is needful to prevent these conditions from occurring by supporting a diet that promotes mid 6 mean urine ph.

    Please understand without a history that can take many posts, I want to give you here what you need to support turning this condition around if at all possible. Just being thorough as I can as to not forget anything. If you have more questions please ask them here save it is something you don't wanted publically posted. In that case let me know here and I will send you a PM so you can share what you desire off the open board.

    I will fill you in more on the rest of the diet when I hear back what you are presently feeding. Take care, DF


    Thank you so much Diggie's Friend, I am so grateful for your help. I am usually on my mob and am finding it difficult to negotiate the board on my mob, and keep getting logged out and losing stuff I've typed. I've managed to get onto the computer, but all my pics are on my mob, so I'll send those separately at the end.

    We got Spidermonkey 2 months into her paralysis. We treated her with large amounts of calcium, following instructions from this board. We kept her on a small amount of calcium for some time afterwards as we are aware that most foods are weighted towards Phosphate. For the last few months she has just had a small amount of mixed vitamins with some Zolcal D in her water every now and then. A few weeks ago we stopped giving her the vitamins. It's hard to know what to do as we can't see a vet with her. I don't know if you are aware but the law has just changed in the UK and although licensed rescues can still take in squirrels they are not allowed to release them, or let them escape (!) so basically a few weeks into baby squirrel season the few licensed rescues that there are will be full and unable to take in more squirrels. She isn't licensed in any case, but in the event that there was a 'friendly' vet previously they are unlikely to be able to help any more.

    Ok diet
    Seeds - none, she doesn't get any.
    Peanuts - also none.
    Potatoes - none.
    Tree nuts - at present she's having 2 almonds, as it was suggested it might help with her spasms (she gets them occasionally - usually with a UTI), previously she was having 1-2 per day, more often just 1, usually hazelnut as it's her favourite.
    Rat food (not sure what block is) I'll post a pic of the ingredients, it's the best I could find based on the research I did.
    Fruit - We stick to the fruits with the better calcium/phosphate ratio. Although she's steadily been getting more fruit than she used to do.
    Veg - again we stick to veg with the better calcium/phosphate ratio. We've been struggling to get her to eat veg of late, but since we took all fruit out of her diet she seems to be enjoying her veg - quite odd!
    She's been getting a finger of dry wholemeal toast a few times per week - the parrots have toast with palm oil (sustainable source) and cayenne pepper, so she's been getting a small piece of toast without anything on. We've stopped giving her that too.
    I've made some 'birdy bread' for the parrots, but when I went through the ingredients I was using, they are all low on the GI index - bananas, eggs, spelt flour, bell pepper, grated carrot, sprout and celery, so that is her new treat, when the birds get their toast. I'm pretty sure she's had butternut squash, and definitely pumpkin and didn't like them, but it's worth trying again as she has a renewed interest in veg. We can sit eating persimmon (her fave) near her cage, and she's not interested! A week ago she'd have been bouncing against the bars!

    Weight - she's 740g, too heavy I know. She had a UTI just before xmas, we treated it, she seemed ok and was reasonably slim. Then she suddenly ballooned, literally in the space of a week or two and started drinking lots. Thought her UTI had come back so put her back on the Baytril for a couple of weeks, but the thirst continued, so obviously we suspected diabetes so I posted on here. We got some test strips last week, they test 10 different things, however the ph goes up in one's so I only know that her ph is reading at 6.It is difficult getting a sample from her. Because we've done physiotherapy with her from the beginning, she's quite happy to be dangled and usually pees when she's been dangling for a minute, so it's a matter of trying to keep her reasonably still to catch it. She's had lots of hydrotherapy too, so isn't afraid of water. The first few tests showed large amounts of glucose and not much else. Yesterday we decided to retest - there was blood (doesn't show up visibly) on both tests and today there was also blood, with a trace of leukocytes and a trace of nitrites, so i'm wondering if her UTI is back, and maybe Baytril isn't strong enough to get rid of it properly.

    The yoghurt isn't stocked in the UK, we've struggled before to find something suitable to put her vitamins/minerals in. Should we start putting them back into her diet?

    I'll look to see what we can source out of the things that you list - once again I am so grateful for your help and support.

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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

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    Ingredients in her rat food

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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    Tonight leukocytes and nitrite -ve and blood just a trace. At the edge of her urethra was an almost healed graze so it's possible it's contaminated the sample. One of the drawbacks of her dragging herself around. I'll test again tomorrow to check.

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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    This is the calcium carbonate we use. It's 400mg/kg. Should we start using it again? If so, how much?

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    Henry's blocks not in UK

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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    Sorry it took so long to get back to you; it took most of the day for me to compile this list and compose this post.

    I looked up the diet you have been feeding, and another by PURR, which is frankly what is called, 'garbage' here on TSB, with salt that should not be added to foods for rodents, soymeal that is very high in oxalate sources. Your diet isn't much better; for any feed that contains cornmeal, soymeal, alfalfa which are all very high in oxalates, would not be supportive to turn around this condition, let alone in a para squirrel, as veterinary research notes that papas are ore predisposed to developing kidney stones due to the impairment of nerves in the abdomen. With diabetes, all of these issue present concurrently as is, no sense in adding to them with a diet that would increase these issues which are all related to metabolic acidosis. These diets are also to low in Ca:P ratio to support turning around low calcium in the diet.

    Considering all these reasons, a low oxalate diet that includes Pycnogenol and other anti inflammatory sources I've listed, are vital to support a squirrel with this condition. In this, we hope though for better thing with the support of this healthier diet with low oxalates, a higher (Ca:P) ratio. Also the use of natural sourced vs. unnatural sourced vitamins. This not a matter of the vitamins not being synthesized in a lab, for those that are provide better potency, but rather of most vitamins being unnatural sourced forms, vs. natural sourced forms, which the body readily identifies that are more absorbable and healthier in that they are able to be readily used by the body, aka: "bio-identical forms", that don't include toxic sourced nutrients.

    As to your question on tree fruits being higher in Phosphorus than calcium, besides N.A. tree fruits being very healthy sources that supply enzymes, fiber, lower carbs, and other vital nutrients to the diet as a whole, they are not acidic promoting, which is key to not overly supporting in the diet, not (Ca:P) that is supported moreover by the supplementation of Calcium. (Ca:P) ratio the sole standard to choosing foods to support a healthy diet, just part of the larger picture, so don't' worry about each food (Ca:P) ratio, as you don't have to do that with this diet if you use measures that support these ratios for both the supplements and whole food sources daily.

    Non-block diets are actually harder to provide sufficient organic phosphorus from whole foods without over-toping the lower calorie level for squirrels in captivity, that lends to the promotion of overly acidic urine. In the wild in the fall tree squirrels consume 32 % greater calories than they require towards putting on fat stores that support both insulation against the cold, along with their denser winter coats, and also supply extra calories over the coldest months of the year when their foods supply begins to wane. In captivity, phosphorus is harder to support in the diet without overtopping their lower caloric need, for the more healthy natural food sources higher in phosphorus are also higher in fat. With healthy organic sources of phosphorus from whole foods, that provide just enough acidity, and alkaline food sources and supplements that provide potassium, magnesium and calcium, a slightly acidic mean urine (ph.), the norm for this species and other small domestic mammals also, can be supported daily.

    For these reasons, be careful to feed only the lower oxalate foods listed, and prepare them as noted. These sources will likely need to have small adjustments in their measure in order to best support optimum target of ph. of mid to high 6 range. So don't worry if you don't get the optimum ph. right away, for their body takes time to reset.

    Before you start you will need to gather all the sources of nutrients mineral, vitamins, protein powder, nutraceuticals, and tools.

    Set of mini Tsp. measuring spoons, and teas strainer for blanching leafy greens and other cut up smaller portions of vegetables.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Measuring-S...202658&sr=8-29

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/FlYHIGH-Str...09263&sr=8-101

    Here are the supplement sources you will need to get to support this diet to reduce diabetes and supply the nutrients that your squirrel needs daily.

    [B]Calcium citrate powder:Calcium Citrate form of calcium has been found to inhibits Oxalate stone forming in rats, yet Calcium carbonate has been found to promote it. magnesium citrate has also been found to inhibit the formation of Calcium oxalate stones, and support a significant increase in bone density in rats than diets that supply a high ratio of Calcium to Magnesium as the 25 year old 1995 Rat Requirement notes.

    Calcium citrate Powder: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Now-Foods-C...qid=1579203184

    Magnesium citrate Powder:

    https://www.amazon.com/Blueberry-Pow...R9GPT7WR28F1YC.

    Acidic Berry powder: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Blueberry-P...xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Pure-Encaps...4&sr=8-1-spell

    More diet nutrient sources to share with you by PM, along with the specific measures to use daily for each nutrient source noted here, and their preparation. DF
    Last edited by island rehabber; 01-16-2020 at 10:57 PM.

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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    Please let me know if I am incorrect, but if possible, I suspect that the OP would benefit from an estimate of how many calories, how many milligrams protein, carbs, fats, est. would be ideal per day or per meal and how much to limit simple carbs, if anyone is capable of that and willing to provide help? I have a very limited understanding of diabetic diets. Apologies of this was already done and I overlooked that. Despite everything I have said, I acknowledge that OP sounds highly educated and may already know all of this and more, but I do not want to assume. I caught the part where all fruit has been eliminated from diet already.

  27. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Rocky1:

    Nancy in New York (01-17-2020), Spidermonkey (01-17-2020)

  28. #16
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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    So sorry, been coping with a serious family health problem. I'll get everything on order tomorrow and reply then.

  29. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Spidermonkey from:

    Diggie's Friend (01-17-2020)

  30. #17
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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    When it rains it often pours.

    I will send you a PM so you can reply.

    Keep in mind, I'm not commonly an early riser; which even for Pacific time I don't rise early.

    When I get back on a good schedule that may be at about 8-ish .
    Of late, I have gotten back into my bad habit of staying up too late from trying to get more done.

  31. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Diggie's Friend:

    RockyPops (01-17-2020), Spidermonkey (01-18-2020)

  32. #18
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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    Quote Originally Posted by Diggie's Friend View Post
    When it rains it often pours.

    I will send you a PM so you can reply.

    Keep in mind, I'm not commonly an early riser; which even for Pacific time I don't rise early.

    When I get back on a good schedule that may be at about 8-ish .
    Of late, I have gotten back into my bad habit of staying up too late from trying to get more done.
    Hi I messaged you back but you have no room in your box 🤔

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  33. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Spidermonkey from:

    Diggie's Friend (01-19-2020)

  34. #19
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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    Hi, Sorry about that. I made a bit of room, go ahead and try again when you read this. DF

  35. #20
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    Default Re: Diabetes in a young(ish) disabled squirrel

    If you find a another block diet, let me know so I can advise on the amounts for the above list of nutrients to include with the block daily.




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