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Thread: Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

  1. #1
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    Default Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

    I was looking around the web today, trying to find out which plants/trees are okay for squirrels to chew on. I looked up cottonwood and crape myrtle since I have that growing in my yard.

    I came across this list of toxic and non-toxic plants for animals, so I thought I'd share it if it will help others as well.


    http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control/plants/

  2. 3 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Rainy9:

    Floppysquirrel04 (11-23-2017), MissAmy (12-11-2016), Rexie (12-06-2016)

  3. #2
    mugzeezma Guest

    Default Re: Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

    Quote Originally Posted by Rainy9
    I was looking around the web today, trying to find out which plants/trees are okay for squirrels to chew on. I looked up cottonwood and crape myrtle since I have that growing in my yard.

    I came across this list of toxic and non-toxic plants for animals, so I thought I'd share it if it will help others as well.


    http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control/plants/
    Here's a list specific to rats
    There is a fee involved if you call the number but worth it for an emergency.


    The Rat Fan Club

    Poisonous Plants

    If you suspect poisoning in your rat (or other pet), here are phone numbers for the National Animal Poison Control Center at the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    1-900-680-0000 You will be charged $45 per case.
    1-800-548-2423 You must have a credit card to use this number and you’ll be charged $45 per case. Both of these numbers are active 24 hours a day. Be ready to provide:
    1. your name, address and phone number;
    2. the species, breed, age, sex, weight and number of animals involved;
    3. the poison, and if known, details such as amount of poison ingested, time since exposure, etc.
    4. the problems your animal is experiencing.

    Here’s two lists of poisonous plants according to level of toxicity.

    The plants in this first list contain a variety of poisons that cause different symptoms, which can include skin rashes, drooling, diarrhea, abdominal pain, depression, tremors, and kidney damage.


    Agave
    Almond leaves & pits
    Aloe vera
    Amaryllis
    Anenome (wildflower)
    Angel Trumpet Tree
    Apple seeds
    Apricot leaves & pits
    Autumn crocus
    Azalea
    Baneberry
    Barilla
    Begonia, sand
    Belladona
    Bindweed
    Bird of Paradise
    Black locust seeds
    Black nightshade berry
    Bleeding heart
    Bloodroot
    Bluebell
    Bluebonnet
    Bottlebrush
    Boxwood
    Bracken fern
    Buckeye seeds
    Buckthorne berries
    Buddist pine
    Buttercup
    Butterfly weed
    Caladium
    Calla lily
    Calamondin orange tree
    Carnation
    Carolina jessamine
    Castor bean
    Celladine
    Ceriman
    Cherry leaves, twigs & pits
    Chinaberry tree
    Chokecherry
    Christmas cherry
    Christmas rose
    Cineraria
    Clematis
    Cockebur
    Columbine
    Cone flower
    Cordatum
    Cornstalk plant
    Croton
    Crown of thorns
    Cuban laurel
    Cycads
    Cyclamen
    Cypress surge
    Daffodil
    Daisy
    Daphne
    Delphinium
    Dianthus
    Diffenbachia (Dumbcane)
    Dragon tree
    Dutchman’s breeches
    Eggplant foliage
    Elaine
    Elder
    Elderberry
    Elephant ears
    Emerald feather
    Ergot
    Eucalyptus
    European bittersweet
    Eyebane
    Fiddle-leaf fig
    Firecracker
    Florida beauty
    Flowering tobacco
    Four O’clock
    Foxglove
    Fruit salad plant
    Geranium
    Golden chain
    Halogeton
    Hemlock
    Holly
    Horse nettle
    Horsechestnut
    Hurricane plant
    Hyacinth
    Hydrandea
    Indian rubber plant
    Iris
    Ivy
    Japanese Plum
    Jack-in-the-pulpit
    Jequirity bean
    Jerusalem cherry
    Jimson weed
    Jonquil
    Juniper
    Lantana
    Larkspur
    Laurel
    Lily of the valley
    Lobelia
    Locoweed
    Lupine
    Marble queen
    Mayapple
    Mexican breadfruit
    Milkweed
    Mistletoe
    Monkshood
    Morning glory
    Mother-in-law’s tongue
    Narcissus
    Nephytis
    Nicotiana
    Nightshade
    Oak leaves
    Oleander
    Oxallis
    Peach leaves & pits
    Pencil cactus
    Peony
    Periwinkle
    Philodendron
    Pigweed
    Pinks
    Plumosa fern
    Podocarpus
    Pointsettia
    Poison ivy
    Poison oak
    Poison sumac
    Poke weed
    Poppy (all but California)
    Potato plant & sprouts
    Pothos
    Precatory bean
    Primrose
    Privet
    Pyrocantha
    Ranunculus
    Red emerald
    Red maple
    Red princess
    Rhododendron
    Rhubarb
    Ribbon plant
    Rosary pea
    Sago palm
    Scotch broom
    Skunk cabbage
    Snow on the mountain
    Spathe flower
    Star of Bethlehem
    String of pearls
    Sweet William
    Sweet pea
    Swiss cheese plant
    Tansy
    Taro vine
    Thorn apple
    Tobacco
    Tomato leaves
    Tulip
    Trumpet Vine
    Violet seeds
    Virginia creeper berries
    Weeping fig
    Western false hellebore
    White snake root
    Wild carrots
    Wild cucumber
    Wild parsip
    Wild peas
    Wisteria
    Yew tree


    Eating or handling small amounts of these plants are unlikely to cause symptoms. However, some individuals may be sensitive to these plants.


    African violet
    Air fern
    Aluminum plant
    Areca palm
    Asparagus fern
    Aster
    Baby's breath
    Baby tears
    Bachelor button
    Bamboo
    Boston fern
    Bromeliad
    Butterfly tulip
    Christmas cactus
    Camelia
    Chinese evergreen
    Coleus
    Corn plant
    Creeping Charlie
    Dahlia
    Dandelion
    Dracaena
    False aralia
    Fittonia, red
    Forsythia
    Fuschia
    Gardenia
    Hawthorne
    Hibiscus
    Impatiens
    Jade plant
    Japanese aralia
    Kalanchoe
    Lipstick plant
    Maidenhair fern
    Magnolia bush
    Mountain ash
    Nasturtium
    Parlor palm
    Peperomia
    Petunia
    Phlox
    Piggyback plant
    Polka dot plant
    Pregnant plant
    Purple passion
    Rose
    Shefflera
    Skimmia
    Snapdragon
    Snake plant
    Spider plant
    Spider aralia
    Staghorn fern
    Swedish ivy
    Sword fern
    Tiger lily
    Umbrella tree
    Velvet plant

    Wandering Jew
    Zebra plant
    Zinnia

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

    Good stuff to know. Thanks for putting that list up mugz.

    EDIT: Ya know, I've thought about this, and you really went out of your way mugz to provide some really improtant info here. I wonder if this could be a made a STICKY?

  5. #4
    slillie Guest

    Default Re: Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

    My wife wants to buy a small Holly Berry tree for the house. Although it is toxic to Horses, cats, dogs humans,....it appears to be nontoxic to squirrels. Can anyone verify that before we put it in the house?

    Thanks

  6. #5
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    Default Re: Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

    Quote Originally Posted by slillie View Post
    My wife wants to buy a small Holly Berry tree for the house. Although it is toxic to Horses, cats, dogs humans,....it appears to be nontoxic to squirrels. Can anyone verify that before we put it in the house?

    Thanks
    I personally wouldn't trust anything that was toxic to any animal.
    Where did she find that it wasn't toxic to squirrels?

  7. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Nancy in New York:

    MissAmy (12-11-2016), SammysMom (12-09-2016)

  8. #6
    slillie Guest

    Default Re: Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

    Quote Originally Posted by Nancy in New York View Post
    I personally wouldn't trust anything that was toxic to any animal.
    Where did she find that it wasn't toxic to squirrels?
    I've found a lot of anecdotal evidence (i.e, videos of squirrels eating berries, etc) and a couple of articles saying that holly berries aren't poisonous to squirrels. Here are two of them.

    http://www.bayjournal.com/article/am...ry_or_wildlife

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CG9K-TapHE0

    Regardless, I am not going to take any chances.

  9. 4 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to slillie:

    MissAmy (12-11-2016), Nancy in New York (12-09-2016), SammysMom (12-09-2016), Squeekhart (01-23-2017)

  10. #7
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    Default Re: Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

    BUMP!!

    As we enter the season of Mistletoe, Pointsettia and other
    Holiday Decorations, it is VERY important
    that we know that these plants are TOXIC to Squirrels!




    This thread has some really good info in it -- PLEASE READ!

    And have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

    Island Rehabber
    NY State Licensed
    Wildlife Rehabilitator


    "Ancora Imparo" (I am still learning)
    Michelangelo


    *
    If you can't afford the vet,
    You can't afford a pet.
    NEGLECT IS ABUSE.

    "Better one day in the trees, than a lifetime in a cage."

    '...and the greatest of these, is Love. '

  11. 3 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to island rehabber:

    Diggie's Friend (11-22-2017), lennysmom (11-23-2017), Nancy in New York (11-22-2017)

  12. #8
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    Default Re: Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

    See my wild squirrel adventures in the thread "Squirtle's yard!":
    https://thesquirrelboard.com/forums/...quirtle-s-Yard!

    Loving dad to Sir Max, 2017-2018. There is no foot so small that it cannot leave an imprint on this world.

    "Once in a while you get shown the light, In the strangest of places if you look at it right."
    -Grateful Dead

  13. #9
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    Default Re: Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

    So are most of the pretty potted tropical plants that are often given as gifts this time of year. Some can cause swelling of the throat when just bitten into, like oxalates. Some varieties contain micro calcium oxalate crystals known as 'Raphides' (see photo attachment) If a squirrel eats kiwi fruit, depending on the level of oxalates the variety contains, this may occur; again another reason that this fruit should not be fed to tree squirrels.

    Best rule is if it is not a normal source of food in their diet then don't feed it on a whimsy. Do not feed processed foods to take cute photos, it just isn't worth it! Don't experiment with new sources because you think your squirrel might like it, for what you offer by hand they will often try as they expect it to be good coming from you. And finally, when in doubt, don't guess, but take some time to look up all you give your squirrel to see if it is truly safe, and then beyond just safe, healthly. Get a number of references, for misinformation is widespread on the internet.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  14. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Diggie's Friend:

    island rehabber (11-22-2017), Nancy in New York (11-23-2017)

  15. #10
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    Default Re: Toxic and Non-Toxic Plants

    I was looking online for Camellia as far any issue of toxicity. The ASPCA states that Camellia Sinensis is not toxic to humans and pets.

    https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/anima...ommon-camellia

    The plant nursery thought it was toxic, having confused it with the toxic species Mountain Camellia (white flowers) that grows in the

    Piedmont mountains of the Carolinas.

    This study used Camillia Sinensis extract to ameliorate a toxin in rat kidneys.

    https://www.e-sciencecentral.org/articles/SC000020153

    The University of Connecticut says Camellia (Sinensisi) is safe around humans and pets. Also noted that if allot was ingested that could be a

    problem; moreover most plant materials if consumed in more than a small amount can cause gastrointestinal distress, so don't offer the

    leaves or stems of camellias to a squirrel.

    https://homeguides.sfgate.com/camell...ogs-74485.html



    I can hardly wait to plant the two Camellia (Sinensis) Japonicas we got to go against our shade wall where we put out walnuts with calcium for the squirrels.

  16. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Diggie's Friend from:

    Sir Rodney (10-14-2019)

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