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Thread: Corn

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Question Corn

    Can squirrels chew on corn cobs?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Default Re: Corn

    Corn, Raw* 2 ca:89 phos g --- 1:0:44.5

    This info is from the Calcium/phosphorus ratio food charts provided here https://thesquirrelboard.com/forums/...sphorus-Ratios

    Corn has a ton of phosphorus which can lead to problems like metabolic bone disease so it's mostly on the No-No list but just like some seeds and nuts, an OCCASIONAL treat for a squirrel on an otherwise healthy diet should be ok.

  3. 3 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to cava:

    ClemC5 (10-15-2018), Diggie's Friend (10-24-2018), Mennome (10-15-2018)

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Corn

    Got it. Thank you. Does anyone see a problem with cob if they want it?

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Default Re: Corn

    The cob isn't a problem but I don't think they will have any interest in it. On the rare occasion when my little ones get fresh corn they are very happy to leave the cob laying on the floor. Fresh oak branches would be much more appealing to them.

  6. #5
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Corn

    Surveys in the field and studies on controlled plots have shown that Aspergiilus Flavus can infect corn and produce alfatoxin before harvest
    https://naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/28327/PDF

    https://gipsa.usda.gov/fgis/publicat...f/mycobook.pdf

    Corn and corn silk have been found to have one of the very highest occurrences of contamination by Aspergillus Flavius, a fungus that produces deadly alfatoxins, of which the spores are most everywhere. The husks, and corn silk of corn ears, that commonly contain the spores that aren't visible to the naked eye, get down in between the corn silk hairs.

    For this reason corn, cornmeal, and other grain product sources, that are also susceptible to A. Flavius fungus contamination and damage are regularly tested with alfatoxin testing strips.

    With Ca:P, as noted, to have a highly inverted Ca:P ratio, save for being a main phosphorus source component from cornmeal in most rodent block sources, to which calcium carbonate is added to support both a positive Ca:P ratio, but also optimum mean urine pH. For these reasons adding more corn to the diet is contraindicated due to both the higher level of phosphorus, and its high carb profile also.

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