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Thread: Cancers in rodents

  1. #1
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    Default Cancers in rodents

    Incidents of cancers have been found to commonly occur in rats.

    To a lesser degree they have been found to occur in tree squirrels cared for in captivity, this mostly associated with obesity, but also with infections.

    This procedure to remove a large cancerous growth from the intestines of a rat, and resection the bowel, was successfully accomplished.

    Rather amazing to see this done on such a small animal, yet with todays technology it is now possible. Warning this file contains photos of graphic content!
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    ClemC5 (08-28-2018)

  3. #2
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    Default Re: Cancers in rodents

    I noticed they were very specific about the amount of Isoflurane v O2 used for induction and maintenance during diagnostics. This info would be valuable for anyone working with a vet who is doing this for the first time with a rodent.

    Thanks for sharing!

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    Diggie's Friend (08-28-2018), HWilson (02-02-2022)

  5. #3
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    Default Re: Cancers in rodents

    Well spotted Cava!

    I have another file on anesthesia I will post under that title.

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    cava (08-28-2018)

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    Default Re: Cancers in rodents

    Liver cancers: causes and carcinogenisis

    https://focusontoxpath.com/lectures/...inogenesis.pdf

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    cava (09-25-2018)

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    Default Re: Cancers in rodents

    Liver cancer in notably has the highest incidence in rats and mice of all other organs of the body.

    In prairie dogs, a virus has been found to promote liver cancer.

    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/ful...54/vp.41-4-353

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    Default Re: GMO sources in Oxbow and likely other commercial rodent block

    In Germany Liver disease is treated with sources that have one particular compound in common, quercitin.

    As noted in a research paper on this issue, Both Milk Thistle seed extract and Pycnogenol contain this same compound, that was originally ignored, for reason of the health promoting properties in the polyphenols that these sources both contain. The other source noted to contain this compound common to these sources is onions; yet onions contain amines that cause anemia in rodents, so that one isn't a whole food that should be included in the diet of rats or tree squirrels.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...teatohepatitis

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    Default Re: Cancers in rodents

    'Long term' regular consumption of Soy stresses the pancreas which can lead to the development of pancreatic cancer.


    https://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist....-the-pancreas/

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    Default Re: Cancers in rodents


    Article on the effect of CBD on cancer cells


    In 2011, researchers from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, MA, examined the effects of CBD on breast cancer cells.

    The study was conducted in vitro, meaning either in a test tube or sample dish, rather than on an actual living organism. Nonetheless, the results were impressive:
    The researchers found that CBD helped induced the programmed death of the cancer cells while causing minimal damage to healthy cells.

    How exactly CBD does this, however, wasnít clear. We know that CBD interacts with the bodyís Endocannabinoid System, but the researchers noted that the effects they observed happened independently of any cannabinoid receptor activity.

    They did notice, however, that CBD somehow helped organize autophagy (the destruction of damaged tissue) and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

    Seeing that cancer is characterized by the unnatural growth and death of cells, the fact that CBD might help regulate cell growth and death is big news.

    In 2011, the journal of Breast Cancer Research and Treatment published another similar study on CBD and its effects on breast cancer cells. This study, however, was done in vivo on mice.

    The researchers noted that CBD helped to slow the proliferation of the breast cancer cells.
    Furthermore, they also found that CBD helped reduce the metastasis of the tumor cells.

    The authors of the study noted that this is clear evidence of CBDís anti-tumor effects and suggested it is a promising compound that should be the study of further clinical trials.
    They also noted that CBD helped reduce the expression of ID-1, a gene that plays a vital role in the development of aggressive breast cancer.

    Other studies have also shown similar results on other cancers.
    In 2003, for example, researchers found cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 present in both healthy and cancerous skin cells in mice.
    https://www.healthline.com/health/ca...r#side-effects

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    Snicker Bar (12-28-2020)

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    Default Re: Cancers in rodents- Lymphomas

    This veterinary journal (not a research animal study) is the record of the occurance of a specific form of Lymphoma in an elderly pet Eastern Gray Squirrel. Since most with squirrels in non legal States may not take a pet squirrel to their vet, this journal is of special importance as it provides information on the occurance of a specific form of lymphoma in a tree squirrel.

    After the removal of the lesion, that the squirrel didn't have a reoccurance within the time recorded, is notable.

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/20460390
    In rats lymphomas are mostly fatal.
    Other forms of lymphoma occur in rodents, both in rats and tree squirrels; in rats all forms are commonly fatal. In this tree squirrel after the surgical removal of the lesion it apparently didn't return. This isn't to sa that it couldn't, for as the journal specifically notes it was expected to return.

    This is just one form. for photos (Fig. 1) see Ratguide.com for this form of lymphoma. It doesn't start out looking crusty, but ends up this way when the lesion breaks open. Other forms of lymphoma in rodents manifest in lumps just under the skin. In most all cases lymphoma is a disease common to rodents of advanced age.

    https://ratguide.com/health/neoplasia/lymphomas.php

    What is noted in research is advanced age in which the immune system lowers. Exposure to bacteria, viruses, herbicides and pesticides are amongst the other promoters of this disease in aged rodents.

    Should you have had a squirrel in the past or present that developed one of these three forms of lymphoma;I I would welcome you to post your experience on this thread, along with any photos of your or another's squirrel while it was alive. Pleases also include a warning to other members that viewing the photos may be upsetting.

    Thank you, DF

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    Default Re: Cancers in rodents

    In cancers common to rodents, viruses, toxins, and aging are the most common factors.

    "Secondary testicular tumors can develop when metastasis has occurred from another area of the body.
    Metastatic conditions that can be responsible for secondary tumor development in the testicles are lymphoma and leukemia."
    "Even though it is rare in rats for testicular tumors to metastasize to other areas of the body;
    the recommended treatment for these tumors is orchiectomy (neutering or removal of the testicles).
    This is because the inevitable growth of these tumors can cause ureteral and bowel obstruction."
    To read more on various forms of testicular cancers in rodents, see Ratguide.com .

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  18. #11
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    Default Re: Cancers in rodents

    DF, does your research mention anything about dietary causes of tumors in rats?

    The nature center where I work adopted three young rattie brothers, all albino, to keep them from being sold as boa or python food. Somewhere in the course of
    learning about them, I read that citrus fruits should never be given to male rats as they cause cancerous tumors. We do feed tangerines and oranges to other animals at the center, so i wanted to be sure we should keep avoiding these. (The bro's smell the citrus fruits and really want them!)
    Island Rehabber
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    NEGLECT IS ABUSE.

    "Better one day in the trees, than a lifetime in a cage."

    '...and the greatest of these, is Love. '

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    Default Re: Cancers in rodents

    See my PM

  20. #13
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    Default Re: Cancers in rodents

    Along with advanced age, viruses are also noted to promote cancers.

    Abstract
    Cutaneous epitheliotropic T-cell lymphoma with liver metastasis was diagnosed in a 10-year-old eastern chipmunk (Tamias striatus). Physical findings included intracutaneous swellings, ulcerated plaques and nodules, hypotrichosis and erythema of the skin. [B]Fine needle aspiration from the skin lesions showed a population of large lymphocytes and lymphoblasts, and was helpful in establishing the diagnosis antemortem. The post-mortem examination revealed epitheliotropic lymphoma with liver metastasis. Immunohistochemistry proved the T-cell origin both in the liver and skin tumours. Electron microscopy did not reveal any viral particles within the tumour. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of lymphoma described in this species
    .

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