Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: poassible bloat

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    FLorida for now
    Posts
    1
    Thanked: 0

    Default poassible bloat

    Hi, I am new to this site and never posted before .
    I have two young female gray squirrel age approx. 5-6 months named Honey and Willow .Both ate this morning as usual . Now one of them appears bloated and want to stay in in her little hanging hut. The other is running around playing as usual.
    I have never experienced anything like this before with any of my young ones.
    Could someone tell me if this is in fact bloat and what to do for it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Northeast Georgia
    Posts
    4,205
    Thanked: 3490

    Default Re: poassible bloat

    In order to be able to assess we'll need more information.

    If you can post a picture of her belly that would be of immense help.

    What formula are you feeding (be very precise)?

    How much does she weigh and how much are you feeding her?

    Did you listen to see if she is clicking when she breaths?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Northeast Georgia
    Posts
    4,205
    Thanked: 3490

    Default Re: poassible bloat

    Just was checking back and noticed these are 5-6 month old squirrels (and not 5-6 weeks old as I had thought)... so they may not be getting formula any longer. Providing what their diet consists of and and the picture would still help a lot.

    Squirrels 5 - 6 months old are ready for release, and in Florida releasing can basically happen year round....

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,906
    Thanked: 1805

    Default Re: poassible bloat

    This may be due to the one squirrel not drinking as much as the other, we had that happen also with two of those we had raised. getting water into them without getting it into their lungs can be tricky. if you can hold the squirrel and give them a bit at a time on their tongue just behind the incisors in the open space in front of the back teeth, would be safest. You may also want to add plain organic yogurt (Green Valley) carries this in a lactose free version.

    Also to address and prevent bloat in juveniles, include Soil Based Pre/Probiotics Pet Flora (Vitality Science). This is like unto that squirrels in the wild consume from the soil in support of their digestion of their foods, and prevent gas build up. This source unlike most others, contains no additives.

    https://www.amazon.com/Pet-Flora-cap...upplies&sr=1-8

    There is a condition that can occur in rodents known as Megacolon. If the above doesn't resolve this issue, you may need to check with a veterinarian to see if this is the cause. In Florida, Dr. Emerson is one of the few Vest that have greater knowledge of tree squirrels.

  5. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Diggie's Friend from:

    paws4life321@gmail.com (04-01-2019)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •