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Thread: Apple cider vinegar

  1. #1
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    Default Apple cider vinegar

    I was under the impression that apple cider vinegar could be used to deter squirrels. Well, I decided to get on the ACV health kick bandwagon and mixed 2 tablespoons of this gosh awful stuff in a cup of purified water. I turned to put the acv in the fridge and when I turned around, Rose had her head in my glass. She lapped a few times and came up smacking her lips. She looked slightly interested in another taste but I distracted her with her favorite syringe full of water to dilute the acv even more. It wasn't strong enough to cause burns anyway, but just being cautious. I regularly put it in my birds water dishes but birds and squirrels are obviously different species. You can give it to dogs as well. Does anyone happen to know if it's ok for her and whether or not I should let her drink more on occasion? I definitely didn't think she would ever try it and was even afraid she would run from me if she smelled it on my breath 😂. She's a really unusual squirrel! Oh, she's a yr old, perfect diet unless she's being stubborn about her 2nd HHB, but we'll work that out amongst ourselves.

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Apple cider vinegar

    imho, even in humans acv should be used with caution, there is no definitive research on it, some say it's great, others - not so much.
    It may not be advisable for ppl with GIT problems such as ulcers and gastritis b/c it is caustic and can be corrosive - but those are the things that should be discussed with one's physician on an individual basis.

    B/c of this ^ acv use in rodents is not certain either. Again, some say - use it, others - hesitant, again because there is hardly any research, esp. on squirrels.

    If you want to include acv in her diet, start with a very diluted ratio (I've seen somewhere smth about 2tbsp per gallon).

    Also, water with any additions like acv shouldn't really replace regular water supply. She needs to have access to regular, filtered (no chlorine) water at all times.
    Some suggest giving acv-containing water on and off, say 3 times a week or something. Or, give acv-water for a month, then - take a month or two break (in fact, even in humans on and off consumption of things like acv and such is also recommended. You always want to give your system a break)

    That's what I know about using acv for sqs.

    Hopefully, other ppl will share their experience with it.

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  5. #3
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    Default Re: Apple cider vinegar

    forgot to add. If you decide to use acv for yourself or your non-humans, get the organic stuff with what they call "mother" - a colony of beneficial bacteria. For that you'll need organic unrefined, unfiltered and unpasteurized acv. Don't use the processed stuff - it is no good and useless. Must be organic, b/c non-organic apples are on top of the heavily sprayed list.
    For your sq start with 2tbsp per gallon, and, as far as I remember, you can bring it to 4 tbsp per gallon gradually <-- but that's the info I have come across, haven't used it myself so can't say anything specific, other than - on and off regime (as I mentioned before) is the way to go with pretty much any supplement.

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  7. #4
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    Default Re: Apple cider vinegar

    I think this was due more to the glass rather than the content. For some strange reason squirrels LOVE to reach down into a glass and drink... WHATEVER! I don’t dare sit my ice tea glass down or I will surely have a squirrel mug slobbering in my tea. They will drink water, tea, ACV, beer, wine... anything in a glass.
    I guess it’s a ‘squirrel thang’.

    A drink of dilute acv certainly won’t hurt a squirrel but I see no reason to offer it.

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  9. #5
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    Default Re: Apple cider vinegar

    Quote Originally Posted by astra View Post
    imho, even in humans acv should be used with caution, there is no definitive research on it, some say it's great, others - not so much.
    It may not be advisable for ppl with GIT problems such as ulcers and gastritis b/c it is caustic and can be corrosive - but those are the things that should be discussed with one's physician on an individual basis.

    B/c of this ^ acv use in rodents is not certain either. Again, some say - use it, others - hesitant, again because there is hardly any research, esp. on squirrels.

    If you want to include acv in her diet, start with a very diluted ratio (I've seen somewhere smth about 2tbsp per gallon).

    Also, water with any additions like acv shouldn't really replace regular water supply. She needs to have access to regular, filtered (no chlorine) water at all times.
    Some suggest giving acv-containing water on and off, say 3 times a week or something. Or, give acv-water for a month, then - take a month or two break (in fact, even in humans on and off consumption of things like acv and such is also recommended. You always want to give your system a break)

    That's what I know about using acv for sqs.

    Hopefully, other ppl will share their experience with it.
    Interesting! I actually cured my gastritis years ago with acv! No doubt it isn't for everyone though! I tend to have low stomach acid due to a botched gallbladder surgery.

  10. #6
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    Default Re: Apple cider vinegar

    ACV is a highly acidic lightly processed concentrated source, not a whole foods form. In humans ACV is used as tonic to dissolve alkaline bladderstones in vivo, yet once metabolized it promotes alkaline urine. Lemons, which are highly acidic in pH do the same thing. This was confirmed when more than a one or two drops was added to a whole foods diet, as it caused the urine pH to rise into the unhealthy (7) range.

    In rodents fed diets that promote alkaline urine pH above (7.0), calcium and phosphorus is dumped into the urine in support to maintain blood serum pH homeostasis. Then the Calcium phosphate precipitates out of the urine into sharp disassociated crystals that collect in the bladder. When a sufficiently dense mass of these crystals accummulate in the bladder, they will brade the lining of the bladder causing pain and infection.

    What veterinarians advise to correct this dietary caused error, is to acidify the diet by reducing those foods that are highly alkaline pH promoting, which include raw leafy greens and vegetables. Sadly this source may mistakenly be chosen to support that acidification, thus perpetuating this condition not resolving it.

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  12. #7
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    Default Re: Apple cider vinegar

    Just a small clarification in regards to acidifying a diet; this refers to bringing the pH up into the 'slightly acidic' 6 range, as 6.5 is noted to be the normal mean urine pH for small mammals, not into the' highly acidic' unhealthy range that is known to promote another form of kidney and bladder urinary calculi (stone).

    If you haven't already, add organic applesauce to her diet (1/4 Tsp.), which mixed into Low Fat plain organic yogurt, not only will give the yogurt a more appealing taste, but also will support the uptake of the calcium in the yogurt.

    Avoid including all sources which add natural or artificial sugars, including syrups, save for using a drop or two of organic maple sugar, or organic dark molasses on the gums to bring up blood sugar in the case of an unexpected seisure. For having these sources on hand, even so seisures may be unlikely to occur, is like having a med kit incase of injury, which may help to save a life.

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