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Thread: Sq drinking pee

  1. #1
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    Default Sq drinking pee

    Hi all, it has been awhile for me. I have a female sq almost 6 yrs old, lately she has been peeing and then drinking it, sometimes I feel she pees solely to drink it. She has plenty of water in sipper bottle. Has anyone else seen this? I feed her foods from the diet I got from the board, henrys and mazuri rodent blocks. I am good about not too many treats or nuts and her weight is always good, except for symmertime she starts running aroung and using her tunnel to go outside to her outside house. She is very active. I need some input as soon as you can. Thank you

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Sq drinking pee

    In research studies, some of the non diabetic rats were found to drink their own urine because it tastes sweet; whereas some rats with diabetes were found drank their own urine, that also supported maintaining their bloodsugar.

    It is possible for tree squirrels to have hereditary Type 1 diabetes, in which drinking their own urine is in an attempt to maintain an sufficient bloodsugar levels.

    It is also possible that this behavior in tree squirrels may be do to the squirrels having developed Type 2 diabetes from a diet that is too high in in processed grains, and sugars from the over feeding and over ingestion of rodent block in adult animals.

    This is not to say your squirrel is obese, or has type 1 or 2 diabetes, as I have no way to know that. Rather it is only to share information that may be relavant to the health of your squirrel.

    I would recommend that you take a urine sample to your veterinarian to have it tested to see if your squirrel has diabetes. If so, and it is type 1, you will need to feed smaller meals more often to support your squirrels blood sugar levels, and not feed foods that support spikes in blood sugar because that can promote diabetic seisures.

    If type 2 diabetes was confirmed, the cause of which is a faulty diet, then the diet would need to be reduced in the amounts of specific foods fed to prevent, or reduce obesity that is directly related to the onset of diabetes in tree squirrels, as is the development of tumors.

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  5. #3
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    Default Re: Sq drinking pee

    I am relatively new to squirrels and so I have not witnessed squirrels drinking their pee; however, lately I have been studying a very unique therapy called urine therapy. Apparently urine is not simply a waste product as many of us have thought it to be. It is a product of blood filtration, and contains huge amounts of many beneficial things that heal many ailments when re-ingested or used topically. ( I know, the gag-disgust response is normal when thinking of this )

    Goats have been known to bow their heads and drink their own urine straight from the stream. Believe it or not, humans have done this for thousands of years. It was popular for doctors to suggest this in the USA until a law was passed about the time of the world war 1 or 2, that forbid them to recommend it, thus the commonness of it died out and we don't hear of it anymore. But it used to be common to go to the doctor and have him suggest this.

    I might think that maybe the squirrels own internal guidance system is telling the squirrel that it needs the elements contained in the urine to fix something that is going on in it's body. If what I am reading is true, urine contains mineral salts necessary for health, it also contains elements that can reprogram and heal internal body parts, it has been known to reduce and completely eliminate some tumors, it has vitamins and minerals, even antibodies and natural vaccine serums that the body has created for exactly what is needed for that particular organism at the time.

    According to the sources that I read, our blood must be balanced at all times, so our kidneys filter out any substance that it has too much of. That does not mean that it is a toxic substance, it just has too much of it, so within hours, the balance might actually require the substance that was removed, and re-ingesting it is the easiest way for the body to not to have to produce it from scratch by eating more food to manufacture it, in the urine, it is already in a raw material form easy for the body to re-use.

    Just FYI, I wanted to share what I have been studying, since it is exactly in the topic of your question.

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    Default Re: Sq drinking pee



    And for all of those reasons is why Dr. E makes “poop soup” for squirrels with GI issues.

  8. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Mel1959 from:

    LR (02-02-2018)

  9. #5
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    Default Re: Sq drinking pee

    As I mentioned I feed from the list of foods I got from the board. I stay in the good list. For the most part I feed in am, then give a snack, then another block, I know sqs hunt for something to eat all the time and want something all the time. Fortunately most days I can do that. I give red/ green lettuce, romaine, belgium endive, Boston, snap peas, henrys, block, apple, sw pot, water chestnuts, cukes, mushrooms ( not often) brussels, broccoli, kale ( purple & green) zucchini ( not often) squash, turnips, bok choy and baby bok, pb ( not often) banana skin ( treat, not often, so of these what is bad enough to cause diabetes? She has never been over weight and this is sorta sudden. I just took her to the dr and mentioned she was drinking her pee and he didnt suggest testing her pee.

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    LR (02-02-2018)

  11. #6
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    Default Re: Sq drinking pee

    I am very concerned as i try very hard to feed properly, i keep sweet/fruits down so weight stays healthy and too many sweets causes diarrhea. Her weight has always been right on, in summer she does lose weight running around more through her tunnel to the outside house. So is there something wrong with the foods i feed? Someone mentioned the mazuri rodent block can be an issue.

  12. #7
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    Default Re: Sq drinking pee

    Is her weight close to 600 grams, or is it lower or higher?

    Unless you feed sugared dried fruit 1 Tsp. of a tree fruit, or sugared yogurts, or other sources, none of which are good for tree squirels, as high sugar in the diet causes calcium loss in the urine. If you feed no more than 1 1/2 Tsp. of fresh organic tree fruit, and 1 1/2 Tsp. fresh organic berries, the diet is not in excess in fruits, as fresh fruits are noted to counter diabetes, not cause it. It is the grains like corn, wheat, that provide complex carbohydrates, that are high in carbs that lend to the development of diabetes in adult squirrels that are free fed, or feed too much rodent block, that leads to obesity and diabetes in these animals. In captivity it is needful to limit the caloric intake as veterinarians direct, for these animals can develop the same metabolic disorders that domestic pets can. Keeping squirrels on the lean side not allowing the fat to build up over teh seasons, which tends to increase over the years een when soe is lost in the fall, is needful to prevent the accummulation of visceral fat that collects in and around the internal organs.

  13. #8
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    Default Re: Sq drinking pee

    Sorry for the edit blips. I rewrote my post here to make it clearer and remove the blips.
    Hi slee,

    Unless you are feeding sugared, and or, dried fruit, sweetened yogurt, or other sources that add sugar to fruit which is not naturally occuring, none of which are good for tree squirrels, as high sugar in the diet causes calcium loss in the urine. If you feed about 1 1/2 Tsp. of fresh organic tree fruit, and 1 1/2 Tsp. fresh organic berries, the diet should not be excess in fresh fruits that are known to counter diabetes, not cause it. Only if your squirrel had type 1 diabetes would it be needful to ration out the fresh fruits.

    (Be sure to not include any sources of fruit that contain artifical sugars of any kind, as these are neurotoxic to rodents.)_

    It corn, wheat, and barley, the grains with complex carbohydrates that are high in carbs, and can cause too much fat gain, just like too many nuts can, that lend to the development of diabetes in adult squirrels. For when block is free fed, or over fed, it leads to obesity and diabetes in the adults over time.

    For this reason it is needful to limit the caloric intake of captive care squirrels, just as our veterinarian counseled us, saying that these wilds can develop the same metabolic disorders that domestic pets can when allowed to put on weight that they don't need in captivity. For excess fat can easily build up over the years when not lost in the fall frenzy. This fat is not the under the skin fat that squirels put on in the wild, but internal "visceral fat", which tends to build up in and around the inner organs leading to obesity, and organ disease like fatty liver and diabetes.

    Other than looking for evidence of this fat on an x ray, where our Vet once pointed out to us on our squirrel, excess fat can be seen in what some call 'scoobs'; this is where the squirrel looks like could use a bra. This is evidence that there is also excess fat stored internally, caused from a diet toos high in calories, be they from fats, carbs, or protein. Is your squirrel's weight presently close to 600 grams, or is it lower or higher?

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