Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Magnesium

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    354
    Thanked: 294

    Default Magnesium

    Magnesium:

    Magnesium is the most deficient mineral at the present in the diets of humans, and their pets. In the last Century rat and human research and has confirmed the need for a close ratio of Calcium to Phosphorus, as it was the high ratio of calcium to magnesium that was found to be the chief cause for the high incidence of osteoporosis in human in our Country and in Europe, in the last century to today. Why it wasn't in the third World countries, as that their soils and diets aren't deficient in this key macromineral. The greatest occurance of Osteoporosis has been found in Europe and in the US.

    In studies done now over 75 years, it has been shown that the cultivars grown in our soils have been dropping in their level of Calcium, Magnesium, and Phosphorus. It is no wonder then that the plants grown in them, and the animals produced on these plant sources have also. Even as far back as the mid last century it was known that with the calves of cows fed on grass, if not supplemented with magnesium by the 3rd month they will often develop tetany, and die.

    article-201006-better-crops-magnesium.pdf

    The soils that have also been studies longterm from 1940 to the present also have shown the drop in these key minerals, yet with calcium supplementation at an all time high in human and commercial pet diets, it is magnesium that is the number one deficient mineral in our diets and that of our pets.

    Magnesium, along with D3 hormone, is responsible for the support of the uptake of calcium into the bloodstream, and from there into the bone; this confirmed by rat research.

    For this reason it is needful to support the health of humans and pets with a close ratio of Calcium to Magnesium in their diets, not just a close ratio of Calcium to Phosphorus alone.

    The form most supportive of this was found to be magnesium citrate which when paired with Calcium citrate work to support both bone, cell, organ, kidney, and overall metabolic health.

    {See Tables (1, 2, 3, 5) for data on the depletion of minerals in specific fruits and vegetables}
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Diggie's Friend; 07-09-2017 at 11:05 AM. Reason: wrong forrum

  2. 3 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Diggie's Friend:

    JoanP (07-16-2017), Lighten-Up (07-10-2017), redwuff (07-09-2017)

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Pa.
    Posts
    76
    Thanked: 14

    Default Re: Magnesium

    I had written in one post that I thought that there was something missing in our understanding of calcium metabolism. I wonder why and sunflower seeds that seem like a natural food for squirrels caused calcium deficiency . Some one answered that nuts and seed are low in calcium and nuts and seed are only available part of the year. This may be true but I still think something in our understanding of metabolic bone disease is not complete. When I have looked at food charts and tried to figure out what kind of diet one would have to eat to get the recommended ratio of calcium to phosphorus it always seems like it is a struggle to think a normal diet that would have this ratio. I have read enough about metabolic bone disease to believe it is a problem for squirrels and worry about it, but I wonder why wild squirrels would eat more sunflower seeds than are good for them. If animals did not have some sense of what is good for them and what is not I wonder if any would survive. Possibly some times the land cannot support all the squirrels there so they eat what they can get but I still think there is something missing in our understanding of the problem of metabolic bone disease. I wonder if some of the lists of good and bad foods for squirrels are based almost completely on calcium phosphorus ratio without considering other nutritional needs.
    When I look at nuts in a food chart filberts (Hazelnuts) had the best calcium phosphorus ratio that I saw almonds had the second best. I could not find acorns and there may have been some nuts not included in the table.
    People recommend feeding squirrels vegetables, but my experience is that wild squirrels or those allowed to freely go outside will almost never eat vegetables with the exception of avocados, but I do notice them eating leaves. They like a hibiscus on the porch and I worry that they may kill it if I do not do something to protect it. I think some like the leaves and some just want the stems of the leaf they like part of the flowers and chew the bark. I have seen them eat mulberry leaves, I think they may eat grass. I wonder if people who have problems with squirrels raiding their gardens live where there are not enough trees or other vegetation for the squirrels.
    I know that when vitamins and minerals are added artificially it can put thing out of balance in at least two ways. One it can cause a depletion of another mineral or vitamin. Second it can cause there to be too much of a mineral or vitamin in the diet to be healthy. Nothing we do today is natural anymore and we go to tables and food chart or add supplements to fix the problems caused by the unnatural way we do things. One problem with table is that the amount of nutrient in a food can vary quite a bit depending on the way and where food is grown. Sometimes there are errors in tables.
    I think I have read that there is a fungus or mold that grows on leaves around tree roots and is eaten by squirrels and this help them get calcium. Some places close to where I live there is a truck that comes around in the fall and vacuums up leaves that people put on the curb. When something grown on the a piece of land is removed from that land I think the land loses somethings that do not come back . In the post that this reply is added to it has also been mentioned that the way our land has been depleted of some minerals. There may be other way the land has been harmed and other things low or missing in the soil. I think in some places dead animals are removed from the land (perhaps put in a dump or land fill) and this takes calcium from the land and animals cannot chew the bones for calcium. What about all the chemicals people use on their lawn, fields and other places do this cause problems?
    There are some formulas that are called temporary in which the main ingredients are goat’s milk yogurt and heavy whipping cream. I think it is a good idea to add probiotics to these formulas. I think that a probiotic with a lot of the strands is a good idea. I think pasteurization kills probiotics naturally present in milk. There is one brand with 40 probiotic strands and another brand with more than 30. I have used the 40 strand one. I would like to know why people say this is a temporary formula. I have only raised two squirrels with it (they were not pinkies) and it seems to work well. This formula seems more natural to me than formulas that use reconstituted milk with added minerals and vitamins. Most rehabbers recommend the (“scientific formulas”) put out by various companies. I wonder if any formula has killed more squirrels than Fox Valley 32/40, a formula put out by one of these companies. It seems that a lot of people claim this formula form Fox Valley kills squirrels. Some claim cow’s milk scalded or not kills squirrels but they do not always mention if cream was added or what else was added or not added. I think young squirrels have been successfully raised on formulas based on cow’s milk (?scalded or not or both?) and cream.
    Question I would like answered:

    1) What do people think about Dolomite powder? It has Calcium and magnesium. KAL has a Dolomite powder. Is it as good as a combination of calcium citrate and magnesium citrate?


    2) WHY ARE GOAT’S MILK, YOGURT AND CREAM BASED FORMULS CONSIDER ONLY FOR TEMPORARY USE?
    Probiotic can be added

    I trust these formulas more than the commercial formulas

    3) I have noticed that nuts I find burred in flower pot are most often rotten. Squirrels seem to be able to detect a bad nut most of the time before it is opened and when they are fresh I see squirrels eat them so I believe these nuts where good when burred. Is there some reason why the nuts I buy go bad when buried and the nuts naturally present do not. Is this going to be bad for the squirrel when they find the nuts they have burry and are depending on to get thought the winter and had times have gone bad? Is it the nut, the soil use in flower pots, or how much the flowers are watered that cause this?

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    354
    Thanked: 294

    Default Re: Magnesium

    I hope to have this thread moved to nutrition as that was where I had intended to post it. Somehow I did so in this forum.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    354
    Thanked: 294

    Default Re: Magnesium

    Thanks for the move IR!

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    354
    Thanked: 294

    Default Re: Magnesium

    No on the scalded milk formula, not well fortified.

    Dolomite is (Calcium Magnesium carbonate) the form I read in a study that supports kidney stone formation in rats; so no on this one also.

    This is another reason why I chose Calcium Citrate combination with Magnesium Citrate, with D3 and other supportive

    well bioavailable mineral sources, as they work in synergy to support health, and to prevent kidney stone formation when included in a diet

    with a (6.4 to 6.6) mean urine pH, and with a (1.7 : 1) of Ca:Mg, and a (2:1) Ca:P ratio.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Pa.
    Posts
    76
    Thanked: 14

    Default Re: Magnesium

    What about calcium glutamate. Is cow’s milk that is not scalded that bad? If so why?

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    354
    Thanked: 294

    Default Re: Magnesium

    Sorry I took so long to answer, some medical issues going on. In answer to your two questions:

    Quote Originally Posted by ECole View Post
    What about calcium glutamate. Is cow’s milk that is not scalded that bad? If so why?

    1. Calcium Glutamate is a form that is low in elemental in calcium, which requires much higher amounts to be given to compensate.

    For this reason this form does not lend sufficient calcium support to the diets of juvenile or adult tree squirrels.


    2. Cow's milk is not a good match to Squirrel's milk, not enough fat for one, and for another the lactose isn't reduced to where they can digest it.

    It does not well support the nutritional needs of baby Tree Squirrels, and shouldn't be used in place of formula.

    (see file for comparison) Squirrel vs. cow milk are not a match.docx

  9. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Diggie's Friend from:

    island rehabber (07-16-2017)

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    354
    Thanked: 294

    Default Re: Magnesium

    Not speaking of formula, I support using organic plain yogurt in the diet of both juveniles and adult squirrels.


    For weaned juveniles: Stonyfield Organic Whole Fat Plain Yogurt w/ Double Cream

    http://www.stonyfield.com/products/y...eam-plain-31oz


    For older juveniles 16 wks. and up: Stonyfield Organic Whole Fat Plain Yogurt

    http://www.stonyfield.com/products/y...ilk-plain-32oz


    For healthy weight adults: Stonyfield Organic Lowfat Plain Yogurt

    http://www.stonyfield.com/products/y...fat-plain-32oz


    For overweight adults: Stonyfield Organic Fat Free Plain Yogurt

    http://www.stonyfield.com/products/y...fat-free-plain

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    City Island, Bronx, NY
    Posts
    46,455
    Thanked: 6669

    Default Re: Magnesium

    ADMIN NOTE: This thread took off in a different direction and became yet another Formula debate thread. I have removed the last few posts from this Magnesium thread into a milk replacer thread that we have already established here:

    https://thesquirrelboard.com/forums/...94#post1225794

    Please continue to debate both topics as you all see fit -- just keep 'em in the right place.
    I am particularly interested in the use of magnesium by those of us who have squirrels with seizures. Magnesium, in this case contained in raw almonds, has literally changed my Owena's life and we basically discovered it by accident.
    Island Rehabber
    NY State Licensed
    Wildlife Rehabilitator


    "Ancora Imparo" (I am still learning)
    Michelangelo


    *
    If you can't afford the vet,
    You can't afford a pet.
    NEGLECT IS ABUSE.

    "Better one day in the trees, than a lifetime in a cage."

    '...and the greatest of these, is Love. '

  12. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to island rehabber:

    Diggie's Friend (07-27-2017), Jen413 (07-17-2017)

  13. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    354
    Thanked: 294

    Default Re: Magnesium

    Discussion thread:

    IR wrote:

    Please continue to debate both topics as you all see fit -- just keep 'em in the right place.
    I am particularly interested in the use of magnesium by those of us who have squirrels with seizures. Magnesium, in this case contained in raw almonds, has literally changed my Owena's life and we basically discovered it by accident.

    Discussion is welcome on this thread by one and all.

    I have another thread I'm presently endeavoring to build, that I would ask the members not to post on for reason of supporting the continuity of that address. Thank you, DF

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •