Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    Pycnogenol

    The second important study involved patients with metabolic syndrome who were showing early signs of kidney damage (protein in urine) from high blood pressure.21 All patients were treated with ramipril (AltaceŽ), an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor drug used in hypertension, while a subgroup was supplemented with Pycnogenol as well. After six months, the Pycnogenol group experienced a number of improvements over the Ramipril-only group:
    Urinary protein fell 52.7% in supplemented subjects compared to 22.4% in the drug-only group.
    • Blood flow in the kidneys (an essential measure of kidney damage) in the Pycnogenol group improved by 139% compared to less than 100% with Ramipril alone (measured by diastolic flow).
    • C-reactive protein (an important measure of inflammation) dropped by 25.3% in Pycnogenol subjects, but decreased only slightly in the drug-only group.
    • Body mass index (BMI) was lowered in Pycnogenol subjects (5.7%), while the drug-only group did not show any significant changes after treatment.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    L-Carnitine reverses some of the effects of kidney failure.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15071358
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This study has allot of info on the kidney disease in rats, with notations of blood and urine values.

    http://www.polycysticliverdisease.com/pdf/kcit2000.pdf

    Potassium citrate, and sodium Citrate are alkaline, but not as high in pH as Bi-carbonate alkaline water is. Keeping this in mind, raising urine pH that is too low, by moving it up by using these citrates, to near the exact mean urine pH of 6.5 , found for small mammals, was the goal of this research study. This to lend support to the kidneys, and greater metabolic health.

    This article here below explains how using alkalizing water should not be used for kidney failure, for it over shoots the goal of bringing up the pH of the urine to the optimum mean, raising the pH too high.

    https://medlicker.com/926-alkaline-water-dangers

    "Puts extra burden on kidneys"
    "Kidneys are body’s major excretory structures. Another important function of kidneys is to keep your body pH within normal range. For instance, when the body pH increases- becomes more alkaline- the kidneys come into action and start to excrete more bicarbonate ions into the urine. That’s how kidneys function to keep the body pH close to ideal.

    When you drink alkaline water, you’re actually making your body systems more alkaline and increasing the concentration of bicarbonate ions. At first, kidneys take on this problem and can keep the body pH normal by eliminating bicarbonate ions from body. But, once you start to rely heavily on such water, even kidneys fail to excrete all of the bicarbonate ions and this leads to metabolic alkalosis. When the body gets into alkalosis, kidneys start to function more than normal.

    That’s a bad new for all, especially for those who are already suffering from some sort of kidney disease because this will further worsen the kidney damage. If you’re suffering from kidney disease, use of alkaline water is a BIG NO for you!"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v09n05.shtml

    "Magnesium"

    "Kidney stones and magnesium deficiency share the same list of causes, including a diet high in sugar, alcohol, oxalates, and coffee. Magnesium has an important role in the prevention of kidney stone formation.[14] Magnesium stimulates production of calcitonin, which draws calcium out of the blood and soft tissues back into the bones, preventing some forms of arthritis and kidney stones. Magnesium suppresses parathyroid hormone, preventing it from breaking down bone. Magnesium converts vitamin D into its active form so that it can assist in calcium absorption. Magnesium is required to activate an enzyme that is necessary to form new bone. Magnesium regulates active calcium transport. All these factors help place calcium where it needs to be, and not in kidney stones.

    One of magnesium's many jobs is to keep calcium in solution to prevent it from solidifying into crystals; even at times of dehydration, if there is sufficient magnesium, calcium will stay in solution. Magnesium is a pivotal treatment for kidney stones. If you don't have enough magnesium to help dissolve calcium, you will end up with various forms of calcification. This translates into stones, muscle spasms, fibrositis, fibromyalgia, and atherosclerosis (as in calcification of the arteries). Dr. George Bunce has clinically demonstrated the relationship between kidney stones and magnesium deficiency. As early as 1964, Bunce reported the benefits of administering a 420 mg dose of magnesium oxide per day to patients who had a history of frequent stone formation.[14,15] If poorly absorbed magnesium oxide works, other forms of better-absorbed magnesium will work better.

    "Magnesium citrate is a good choice: easy to find, relatively inexpensive and well absorbed."
    In laboratory research, studies were done to determine factors that prevented the formation of kidney stones in rats. In one study, a close ratio of (Ca:P) and (Ca:Mg) (1.60 : 1), was found to prevent kidney stones from forming in the rats.

    In diets for tree squirrels, testing for magnesium bowel tolerance can easily be done, as. Dr. Carolyn Dean, M.D. and N.A. an expert in magnesium in the diet, describes this in her written works. Basically, this is raising magnesium supplementation up till the stool becomes lose, then backing down to where till it firms up.

    I use this source of Magnesium Citrate.

    https://www.amazon.com/Frontier-Magn.../dp/B000UYC3MY for this purpose.

    Since not all supplements measure out to the same mg. amounts, these measures here only apply to using this source.

    With a block diet, add (1/64 Tsp.) in addition every couple days till the stool becomes noodle like; then back down by the same measure to bring stool back to normal pellets, allowing the body a chance to adjust to the increase magnesium, which is normal. Should diarrhea result from the last increase then lower it down (1/64 Tsp.) immediately to where it reaches noodle form and wait a couple of days to see if it firms up again. If not then lower it again by the same measure.

    With the support of a lower anti-nutrient (lower oxalate) (lower goitrogen), and lower fat diet for tree squirrels in captivity, that has a mean urine pH of (6.5), a (6.4-6.6) spread, the mean that has been found for small mammals, and a whole diet ratio of (2:1) for (Ca:P), and a close ratio of (Ca:Mg), long term urinary and metabolic health can be well supported.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    There is another important fact in regard to kidney stone formation in rats; kidney stones more commonly form in the females.

  4. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Diggie's Friend from:

    Toddy (05-27-2018)

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    Overview of symptoms, types, causes, and diagnosis of kidney stones in rats:

    http://www.petmd.com/exotic/conditio...t_urolithiasis

  6. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Diggie's Friend from:

    Toddy (05-27-2018)

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    Include calcium supplements with meals:

    "since taking them in-between meals may actually increase the risk of stone formation".
    Calcium carbonate supports binding up of soluble oxalate (oxalic acid) into the insoluble form of Calcium oxalate in the intestinal tract. Research has confirmed that in most humans very little CaOx is absorbed into the bloodstream, as most of it is lost out the bowel; yet in rats it is noted that though much CaOx is lost out the bowel, allot is absorbed into the bloodstream.

    Calcium citrate supports the kidneys to excrete urinary citrate, which inhibits calcium from bonding with oxalic acid that forms insoluble Calcium oxalate (CaOx); for once free calcium bonds with citrate it then cannot bond with oxalic acid. This is why the citrate form preserves more calcium for the body to use, while inhibiting the formation of (CaOx) stones in the kidneys. For these reasons, a healthy diet that promotes a mean urine pH in the slightly acidic range of (6.4 - 6.9), which is supplemented with Calcium citrate, lends more support to both urinary tract and metabolic bone health in adult rodents.

    A study comparing rats to humans in regards to oxalate absorption:

    "concluded that a higher proportion of dietary oxalate is absorbed in the rat intestine compared with man, and that dietary oxalate accounts for a higher proportion of urinary oxalate in the rat than in man. Intestinal secretion and bacterial degradation of oxalate also appear to be proportionately greater in the rat than in man."
    Last edited by TubeDriver; 09-17-2018 at 02:16 PM.

  8. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Diggie's Friend from:

    Toddy (05-27-2018)

  9. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/art...00543-0407.pdf

    In this first study done on reducing the incidence of kidney stones (nephrocalcinosis) in rats, the two test groups were fed different diets: a calcium deficient diet that provided: (0.7% Ca , 0.8% P, and 0.2 % Mg), along with a supplement of magnesum chloride added to the drinking water; and a calcium enriched diet that provided: (1.4 % , 0.8% P, 0.2% Mg). The results were as follows:

    Of the two methods used to test whether they would prevent kidney stones from forming, “The inclusion of magnesium (chloride) in the drinking water completely prevented the formation of crystals; the use of the calcium-enriched diet significantly reduced the incidence of the lesion (crystals), but did not completely prevent it. Both methods, however, resulted in normal growth curves for the treated animals.
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...22534717394661

    In this study, each of the test groups of rats were fed a diet with a compound that produces a highly acidic calcium oxalate kidney stone provoking diet, not to be confused with a low oxalate slightly acidic diet, that supports a healthy range for urine pH in rats. Of the five test diet groups, a different form of magnesium, with an otherwise identical standard diet was included. The results were as follows: Three forms of magnesium, including Magnesium Citrate, were found to prevent the formation of CaOx urinary calculi in the rats. The other two forms, Magnesium sulfate and Magnesium oxide, failed to prevent the formation of urinary calculi, the precursor to Calcium Oxalate kidney stone formation.

    Abstract

    Magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, magnesium sulfate, magnesium trisilicate, and magnesium citrate were added to a calcium-oxalate lithogenic diet in order to determine their effects in preventing lithogenesis. Male Wistar-strain rats which had been fed the glycolic-acid diet developed marked urinary calculi within four weeks. Rats in the magnesium-hydroxide, magnesium-citrate, and magnesium-trisilicate groups, however, had almost no stones in the urinary system. Rats in the magnesium-oxide and magnesium-sulfate groups showed significantly less effect than those in the former three groups.
    It is notable that Magnesium oxide is the most common default form of magnesium used in rodent block diets. Another magnesium salt form, magnesium carbonate, was found in another study to provoke the formation of kidney stones.

  10. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Diggie's Friend:

    island rehabber (09-29-2017), Toddy (05-27-2018)

  11. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    More on how Magnesium works in the body. Though this article is aimed at education in supporting human health, rats mice and other rodents, unlike most healthy humans that don't as readily absorb all forms into their bloodstream humans, normally absorb all forms of Calcium, even the insoluble forms like Calcium oxalate. For this reason researchers note these animals are stone formers, for if the pH of the diet is too high or low, they are prone to developing different forms of urinary calculi.

    Magnesium

    Magnesium has an important role in the prevention of kidney stone formation.[14] Magnesium stimulates production of calcitonin, which draws calcium out of the blood and soft tissues back into the bones, preventing some forms of arthritis and kidney stones. Magnesium suppresses parathyroid hormone, preventing it from breaking down bone. Magnesium converts vitamin D into its active form so that it can assist in calcium absorption. Magnesium is required to activate an enzyme that is necessary to form new bone. Magnesium regulates active calcium transport. All these factors help place calcium where it needs to be, and not in kidney stones.

    One of magnesium's many jobs is to keep calcium in solution to prevent it from solidifying into crystals; even at times of dehydration, if there is sufficient magnesium, calcium will stay in solution.

    Magnesium citrate is a good choice: easy to find, relatively inexpensive and well absorbed.

    http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v09n05.shtml

  12. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Diggie's Friend:

    island rehabber (09-29-2017), Toddy (05-27-2018)

  13. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    CKD in rats: http://www.2ndchance.info/ratkidney.htm

    This information that this DVM shares on CKD is essential reading for all those that are caring for squirrels prior to entering into their advanced years. For other than the lifespan of rats being considerably shorter than that of tree squirrels, what you will learn about this disease can make a difference in the quality of life and longevity of the squirrels in your care!

  14. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Diggie's Friend from:

    Toddy (05-27-2018)

  15. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    A quick note here. Not long back Magnesium Glycinate was tried out in my squirrel diet, yet it was found it promote too loose stool. I wanted to let those know that I may have encouraged to try this form of magnesium that it didn't work out as well as the one used for 6 years in my organic whole foods diet, that of Magnesium Citrate. During this same period no urinary tract crystals were found in freshly examined urine sample under 400X magnification using a compound microscope with Magnesium Citrate included with Calcium citrate in close dietary ratio.

    In addition, CCM, aka Calcium Citrate Malate, a similar form,. yet far more soluble one than Calcium Citrate, has also been found to not contribute to the formation of urinary calculi (calcium stones in the urinary tract). This highly bioavailable form of calcium paired with Magnesium citrate (2.5 :1) to (3.0 :1) ratio in a moderate oxalate diet that produces no lower than (6.0) that which is highly acidic, or (7.0), that which is alkaline, lends much support towards inhibiting urinary calcium stones, unlike Calcium carbonate, and Calcium phosphate respectively have been known to promote from diets that produce either of these two opposite urine pH extremes.

  16. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Diggie's Friend from:

    Toddy (05-27-2018)

  17. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    A squirrels nest
    Posts
    455
    Thanked: 429

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    This is a great thread DF! Anyone with a senior squee should read through this
    Squammy to Tod

  18. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Toddy from:

    Diggie's Friend (05-28-2018)

  19. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Northeast Mississippi
    Posts
    983
    Thanked: 784

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    We have one of those Living Water attachments for our sink water . It can be adjusted to any pH . My husband gets stones and I swear that thing has something to do with it. Kids always pushing buttons , and he drinks whatever. I only use the regular water for the animals . Because it’s all natural well water . I figure this is the healthiest option of the two ,
    But that other thing idk. If it’s set around 7, I can drink it. Too much in either direction my stomach flips. And not trusting it for the furries.
    Awesome articles , as always DF!

  20. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Snicker Bar from:

    Diggie's Friend (06-18-2018)

  21. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    Note on CCM just incase some missed it. CCM is great, but it taste yucky! I was rather surprised to find it had an off taste when I tried it in water, not taking it in the capsule as I do. It can be added to some water diluted applesauce if used for the MBD treatment. It is often included in fruit juice and not noticed.

    If used in a dough ball recipe adding in Coconut oil seems to sufficiently cover the poor taste it has, at least it did for me. Heating it isn't an option beyond warming it slightly, so cooking is out for this one.

    CCM to date offers greater support for bone density in rats, as this study diagrams show.
    Scroll down to the page with the images of the bone to see the visual comparison from what CCM vs. Calcium carbonate does in this area in rat bone.
    You can actually see the difference in bone structure.


    The experiments reported here provide evidence that CCM builds more trabecular bone than calcium carbonate (CaCO3)in young, growing animals.
    If one defines bioavailability as the absorption and utilization of a nutrient, CCM is a more bioavailable calcium source than CaCO3.
    After 4 wk of feeding, rats fed CCM had 23-25% more trabecular bone than rats fed CaCO3.
    By 12 wk, the difference between these two calcium sources was even greater.
    Rats fed CCM had 44-47% more trabecular bone than rats fed CaCO3.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  22. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    Here's the other basis for using Virgin Coconut oil with CCM.

    http://healthimpactnews.com/2013/vir...sis-rat-model/

  23. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    Kidney damage has been associated with a high sodium diet that is associated with (hypertension) high blood pressure in rats.

    This study found that in rats given a high sugar diet that promotes diabetes, yet when restricted in sodium,

    The low-salt diet improved insulin sensitivity and prevented kidney damage.
    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...ctose-fed_rats

    It is even particularly important to support both a low sugar and low salt diet in older rats that have lowered kidney function.

    Excess sodium in the diet promotes kidney stone formation in rodents.

    Table salt is just plain toxic to the body, which no one that is concerned about their health should deliberately add to their meal, let alone that of a rodent.

    It can also cause an imbalance of potassium and sodium in the body which promotes hypertension, which is hard on the heart and the kidneys.

    https://www.ajkd.org/article/S0272-6386(85)80059-7/pdf
    Last edited by TubeDriver; 06-21-2018 at 06:15 PM.

  24. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Diggie's Friend:

    RamaMama (08-16-2018), TubeDriver (06-21-2018)

  25. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    More on high salt diet in older rats:

    https://www.news-medical.net/news/20...salt-diet.aspx

    After two weeks, all of the rats were switched to a high-salt diet for six days. In response, all of the rats showed a decrease in the level of plasma aldosterone, but the decrease was significantly less in old rats. The young rats drank and urinated more. While the old rats also drank more water, it took them longer to increase their water intake and they still drank less than the younger rats. The small increase in water did not help the old rats to produce more urine or more diluted urine, suggesting that they were not effectively clearing the excess sodium they consumed.

  26. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    More on PKD and how to prevent it. If you haven't already, read about what to look for as the sign of kidney disease in rats.


    http://www.kidneyfailureweb.com/treatment/298.html More on PKD

    Polycystic kidney disease manifests in the enlargement of the kidneys from the formation of cysts, err the name, "Polycystic: 'many cysts'.

    http://www.pkdclinic.org/pkd-symptoms/1842.html

    An ammonia odor is from infection that can occur in relation to this disease.

    Bacteria split urea, separating water from ammonia, which is why you can smell the ammonia

    https://www.2ndchance.info/test.php?page=ratkidney

    Potassium Citrate was found to increase kidney function and lengthen the life of the rats with PKD.

    Citrus fruits, including oranges, grapefruits, cherries, bananas, peaches, apricots are high in both potassium and citric acid.

    Yogurt is also a good source of Potassium citrate.

    Potassium citrate is an alkalizing mineral used to counter highly acidic diet that produces urine pH below 6.0 .

    This disease still requires calcium supplementation, for calcium is lost due to this condition.

    Calcium citrate is a good form to use to support the urinary tract health of older squirrels cared for in captivity, as it is kidney friendly, not highly acidic, and not highly alkaline. Citrates in food contribute alkalinity to the diet, just not as high as Calcium carbonate does. It is a bonded form of Calcium carbonate with the organic acid Citrate that doesn't promote, but inhibits the loss of calcium in the body from oxalic acid in the diet. Unlike C. Carbonate, C. citrate is a soluble form of calcium that inhibits oxalic acid from bonding with it, which is why this form remains available for the body to use. Calcium citrate is also involved in the Krebs cycle, and plays an active part in bone formation.

    with UTI's related to calcium phosphate bladder stones from a diet too high in pH, to dissolve these stones the urine needs to be acidified.

    It is easy to get the to confused, for infections no matter how they were promoted result in alkaline urine. For this reason is crucial to determine the cause of the infection in order to do more than supply ABs in order to reverse the pH imbalance that often lies at the core of UTI. For one UTI can begin from a diet too acidic can result in Polycystic kidney disease, and promote an infection due to the dysfunction of the kidneys; but another that is from bladder stones, also promotes high pH due to an infection caused by the abrasion of calcium phosphate bladder stones, or Struvite stones that both respond to acidification of the diet.

    Keeping the diet between these two proverbial ditches pH wise is the best cure, as this supports the prevention of these conditions.

  27. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    I was referring to both your Rama and J.D.

    In older squirrels, but also in younger ones, it is important to keep the diet balanced in sodium and potassium, as well as Calcium and phosphorus to Keep kidney disease from developing that is an outcome of metabolic syndrome.

    To counter diabetes from diets too high in phosphorus and sodium sufficient fruits and vegetables that contain Potassium citrate are advised, as is Calcium Citrate that works better than the Calcium carbonate when it comes to supporting kidney and metabolic bone health in older animals as it inhibits kidney stones formation, not supports it. It doesn't take a load of these sources to do this either, but does require diets lower in phosphorus, and higher in calcium.

    In rats: http://www.polycysticliverdisease.com/pdf/kcit2000.pdf

    https://www.kidney-international.org...15)49830-8/pdf

    Potassium citrate is an alkalizing mineral used to counter highly acidic diet that produces urine pH below 6.0 .
    Rat research has confirmed that Potassium Citrate improves kidney function, as does Calcium Citrate.

  28. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    Having posted prior on the health benefits of Styrian pumpkin seed oil, I don't recall ever posting a link to the studies which found this oil to have significant health benefits in rats. This article quotes various studies with research study references, and also includes a bibliography of the studies this article is based upon.

    Pumpkin seeds modulate several cardiovascular disease risk factors. In a recent study published in the African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines, researchers found that rats induced with atherosclerosis and supplemented with pumpkin seeds for 37 days experienced not only significant increases in protective HDL cholesterol but also a 47% decrease in total cholesterol and a 78% reduction in LDL cholesterol (Abuelgassim & Al-Showayman, 2011). The study was designed to check the effect of pumpkin seed supplementation on the concentrations of cholesterol against the effect of L-arginine supplementation. Findings suggest that pumpkin seeds supplementation has a protective effect against atherogenic rats and this protective effect was not attributed to the high arginine concentrations in pumpkin seeds. This has been associated to the high phytosterol content in pumpkin seeds, having the third highest phytosterol content among nuts and seeds commonly consumed as snacks.

    Pumpkin seed oil has also shown powerful antioxidant properties that might ease inflammation associated with arthritic symptoms.
    In a study published in the journal Pharmacology Research, rats induced with arthritis showed significant increased levels of inflammation that were reduced when administered pumpkin seed oil; results that compared favorably to when the rats received the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. Furthermore, the indomethacin-supplemented rats experienced increased levels of liver lipid peroxidation, an indicator of liver injury, whereas the pumpkin seed oil group experienced no side effects (Gamonski, 2012).

    Pumpkin seeds are a rich source of magnesium, phosphorous, and zinc, all overlooked minerals in optimizing bone health and preventing osteoporosis. They are also abundant in tryptophan, an amino acid which might help alleviate anxiety.
    https://www.amazon.com/Pumpkin-Seed-.../dp/B00Z8BRCDO

    Be aware that they are one this is also high in fat as walnuts and pecans are, so limit the number of seeds on that account you feed during the week. By measuring the oils by this means, you can strategically add an individual drop on foods that your squirrel may be picky about eating (leafy greens, rodent block, plain organic yogurt), as this oil lends a nutty flavor and aroma that may make these foods more appealing to your squirrel.

    For PS oil daily, add a total of (0.1 ml) (3 drops from a non-needle ml syringe), approx. (1/64 Tsp.).

    https://www.healthfunatics.com/a-clo...pkin-seed-oil/

    In addition to including organic PS oil, that is a high source of Omega 6 fatty acid, add 'food grade' Chia oil that is a high source of Omega 3 fatty acid, as this supports the balance of these two high Omegas in the diet. For (food grade) chia oil, add a total of (0.2 ml), (6 drops) approx. (1/32 Tsp.), twice the daily supplemental amount of the PS oil.

    (see 4 oz. purchase option on product page): https://www.amazon.com/Foods-Alive-A...hia%2Boil&th=1

  29. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    I thought to revisit the issue of toxins that can combine with various organic sources to form toxins in the body. This can be with organic compounds in whole foods, such as fruits and vegetables, citrates, humates. Thought not the only organic source in a squirrels diet, humates that are super healthy organic compounds are also an ingredient included in both Pet Flora pre probiotic sources.

    Again it isn't these healthy sources that are the problem, but chlorinated water that is. This is why I have in the past shared about being sure to use filtered water but with a system that doesn't strip the water of all the good minerals it naturally contains, just the junk. Aquafina offers various sizes of water filters that removes the bad stuff including chlorine and keeps the good minerals to support optimum health. No commercial here, just sharing one source that can offer this vital support for health. Whatever system you use, make sure your water has had the chlorine removed before using it for your squirrel, and all the other members of your family. Chlorine water test kits can be found at any pool supply, and also at your local home improvement stores.

    To read more about this issue: http://www.relfe.com/A06/drinking_wa..._chlorine.html

  30. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,528
    Thanked: 1485

    Default Re: Kidney Disease Info, Data, and potential treatments

    Part 2 Revisiting the issue of toxins that can combine with various organic sources to form toxins in the body.


    https://wellnessmama.com/2987/fulvic-humic-minerals/

    There is some emerging evidence that water quality is drastically important when taking these types of minerals and probiotics since they don’t react well with chlorine and *might* create a harmful substance when combined with chlorinated water.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •