Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 53

Thread: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    215
    Thanked: 270

    Default Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    A wild female squirrel I'm feeding is either still pregnant or has recently given birth. (It's hard to tell as I throw food to her on the roof below my kitchen window and can't get a good look at her belly.)

    In any case, I'm pretty certain she's got mange (she's constantly scratching like a maniac & has patches of fur missing). I've been feeding her since she was a few months old and she's now about a year old. She's scratched a lot in the past, but it's never been like this before (fur missing/bald spots).

    There are two other squirrels I feed on a daily basis (the two babies from her previous litter) who are around 5 months old. They don't have mange and there isn't much risk of them eating a nut with Ivermectin on it as their mom is quite territorial and has now decided they aren't allowed to be on the roof when she's there (she chases them away).

    The squirrel with mange has never refused a nut, so there isn't much chance of her refusing one with a tiny amount of Ivermectin on it & leaving it for one of the younger squirrels to eat...unless Ivermectin tastes awful.

    So, is Ivermectin safe for pregnant squirrels/squirrels who are nursing their young?

    If not, is there any other way I can help her get rid of the mange (from a distance)?

    Her energy levels are high and she's quite healthy in general, but the mange is driving her crazy. I really want to help her out.

    I'm in the UK, so I'm not even sure I can get Ivermectin, but will start researching it if you TSB experts feel it would be safe to give her.

    Thanks in advance for your help!

  2. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Ekorre from:

    KarmaKay (03-21-2017)

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    8,711
    Thanked: 679

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Yes, it is safe to give Ivermectin to a pregnant or nursing squirrel, just make sure the problem is mange and not Spring molt taking place.

    *Ivermectin: offer a rice size on a nut.

  4. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Rhapsody:

    Ekorre (03-20-2017), KarmaKay (03-21-2017)

  5. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    N. America
    Posts
    8,108
    Thanked: 554

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    how to administer Ivermectin:
    https://thesquirrelboard.com/forums/...Wild-Squirrels

    When you say to leave it for a "younger squirrel" to eat, do you mean to leave it for babies to eat? - unclear. If you intend for babies to eat, then it is not a good idea. The Ivermectin dose ppl use to treat mange in the wild is calculated for adult squirrels. Because it is very easy to overdose, even minimal changes in the dose are crucial - likewise, the fairly significant changes in the squirrel size (as in adults vs. babies) may also prove detrimental b/c the dose will be too big for a small baby.
    This dose is intended for fully grown adult squirrels only.

    Mothers often have scruffy look when they are raising babies (even remember reading that they would even pull their own fur to line the nest for the babies). So, this may not even be mange.
    Also, when you say patches of fur missing - does it look like it was pulled in different places? - because it sounds more like mothers pulling their fur for nests, and/or molt.
    The most common pattern for mange - starts around eyes, and/or can start on the scruff and spread around arms - it will look kind of like a vest (i.e., if a squirrel wore a vest). And the fur loss is usually uniform, i.e., not patchy as if pulled, but spreading gradually over large areas.
    From that "vest" it spreads further around and down the body.
    Of course, there may be other less common patterns of mange spreading, but still - it may be a good idea to get a better look at her fur loss before giving ivermectin.
    Another thing to note - if those missing patches of fur remain more or less consistent (not getting gradually visibly worse) - that may be an indication that it is not mange. Mange is usually progressive, whereas "baby-feeding-related" fur loss and/or molt aren't.

    If possible (if it is, indeed, mange), wait for a week or so (for however long it is possible without letting her mange go too far) before giving ivermectin - for the babies to get bigger and stronger, so that if they end up ingesting some through her milk, it won't do them harm.
    Personally, I have no info on how safe it is for nursing mothers, just trying to use common sense. If anyone has had experience with giving Ivermectin to nursing mothers, i'm sure they will share.

    You could also post pics of her with fur missing, and experienced people here may be able to estimate whether it is mange or molt.

  6. 4 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to astra:

    Ekorre (03-20-2017), KarmaKay (03-21-2017), Mel1959 (03-21-2017), squirrelgirl30 (06-26-2018)

  7. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    215
    Thanked: 270

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by Rhapsody View Post
    Yes, it is safe to give Ivermectin to a pregnant or nursing squirrel, just make sure the problem is mange and not Spring molt taking place.

    *Ivermectin: offer a rice size on a nut.
    Thanks for the information, Rhapsody.

    I've looked at photos of molt and mange (Google search) and I really don't think she's molting. I'm no expert, but that's my best guess based on what I've observed.

    Do squirrels who are molting scratch constantly?

    Her condition seems to be getting worse. She's scratched off all the fur near one of her ears and there are some small patches of fur missing on her lower back as well (they're all places she can reach with her claws).

    Also, what percentage should the Ivermectin be? I see sellers on eBay advertising "0.5% Ivermectin drops" or "1% Ivermectin drops".

    Is Ivermectin bitter or anything (she's not going to eat a nut if it tastes bad)?

    I don't want to treat her for mange if it's something else, but my best guess is that it's mange or dermatophytosis. Her itching like a maniac makes me think it's mange...but I can't be sure.

    Thanks for your help with this!

  8. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    215
    Thanked: 270

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by astra View Post
    how to administer Ivermectin:
    https://thesquirrelboard.com/forums/...Wild-Squirrels

    When you say to leave it for a "younger squirrel" to eat, do you mean to leave it for babies to eat? - unclear. If you intend for babies to eat, then it is not a good idea. The Ivermectin dose ppl use to treat mange in the wild is calculated for adult squirrels. Because it is very easy to overdose, even minimal changes in the dose are crucial - likewise, the fairly significant changes in the squirrel size (as in adults vs. babies) may also prove detrimental b/c the dose will be too big for a small baby.
    This dose is intended for fully grown adult squirrels only.

    Mothers often have scruffy look when they are raising babies (even remember reading that they would even pull their own fur to line the nest for the babies). So, this may not even be mange.
    Also, when you say patches of fur missing - does it look like it was pulled in different places? - because it sounds more like mothers pulling their fur for nests, and/or molt.
    The most common pattern for mange - starts around eyes, and/or can start on the scruff and spread around arms - it will look kind of like a vest (i.e., if a squirrel wore a vest). And the fur loss is usually uniform, i.e., not patchy as if pulled, but spreading gradually over large areas.
    From that "vest" it spreads further around and down the body.
    Of course, there may be other less common patterns of mange spreading, but still - it may be a good idea to get a better look at her fur loss before giving ivermectin.
    Another thing to note - if those missing patches of fur remain more or less consistent (not getting gradually visibly worse) - that may be an indication that it is not mange. Mange is usually progressive, whereas "baby-feeding-related" fur loss and/or molt aren't.

    If possible (if it is, indeed, mange), wait for a week or so (for however long it is possible without letting her mange go too far) before giving ivermectin - for the babies to get bigger and stronger, so that if they end up ingesting some through her milk, it won't do them harm.
    Personally, I have no info on how safe it is for nursing mothers, just trying to use common sense. If anyone has had experience with giving Ivermectin to nursing mothers, i'm sure they will share.

    You could also post pics of her with fur missing, and experienced people here may be able to estimate whether it is mange or molt.
    I really appreciate you taking the time to explain all of this, astra.

    To clarify: there are 3 squirrels that I feed on the roof below my kitchen window every day. One is the mother squirrel who has the issue with her fur (she's a year old). The other two are the babies (now juveniles) from her first litter who are 5-6 months old.

    When I said "younger squirrels" I was referring to the juveniles from her first litter, not the babies she's either just had (or is going to have if she's still pregnant).

    I've looked at photos of molt and mange (Google search) and I really don't think she's molting. I'm no expert, but that's my best guess based on what I've observed.

    Do squirrels who are molting scratch constantly?

    Her condition seems to be getting worse. She's scratched off all the fur near one of her ears and there are some small patches of fur missing on her lower back as well (they're all places she can reach with her claws).

    I don't want to treat her for mange if it's something else, but my best guess is that it's mange or dermatophytosis. Her itching like a maniac makes me think it's mange...but I can't be sure.

    I'll try to get some photos if possible, but she's super fast and I'm quite high up (I can't get close to where she is).

    If I do wind up treating her with Ivermectin, is it paste or drops that I need? I've only seen drops on eBay. Also, what percentage should the Ivermectin be? I see sellers on eBay advertising "0.5% Ivermectin drops" or "1% Ivermectin drops".

    Thanks again for your help with this!

  9. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    N. America
    Posts
    8,108
    Thanked: 554

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    If she is losing fur around her ears and back, and it's progressing, then it does sound like it may be mange.
    (it's kind of hard to say what "a lot of" scratching is -what may seem like a lot to some, may turn out to be around normal amount of scratching to more experienced eyes. But based on what you described - losing fur around ears and back, progressing - likely mange). If you treat her for mange (and it's something else), it won't hurt her as long as you follow the dosage/administering instructions. But it does sound like mange.

    As for ivermectin - the dose above is paste,b/c only paste can be bought w/o prescription here, and "lay" people use that. Drops is a different story - I don't know how to dose drops on a nut b/c I never had access to drops.
    Besides, I think it is easier to dose paste on a nut, b/c you can make it stick, rather than a drop which can simply roll off.

    Re: paste - I've attached two pics. This is what a box generally looks like. Sometimes it may have a brand name of "Selamectin," "Biomectin" and anything else "-mectin," but then on the box it will say that it contains 1.87% Ivermectin.

    Make sure to follow all instructions carefully - when overdosed ivermectin can be fatal.
    And the course of treatment is important for it to be effective.
    Make sure that only she gets the medicated nut. If there is a risk that the juvies may intercept, there may be a risk that the same juvie will intercept again - which will be fatal.
    So, choose a moment/time when it is only she who will get the nut. Name:  42096_A.jpg
Views: 317
Size:  62.4 KBName:  ivermectin-feature-750x284-LRG-750x285.jpg
Views: 315
Size:  39.3 KB

  10. 3 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to astra:

    Ekorre (03-21-2017), Mel1959 (03-21-2017), Nancy in New York (03-21-2017)

  11. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    215
    Thanked: 270

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by astra View Post
    If she is losing fur around her ears and back, and it's progressing, then it does sound like it may be mange.
    (it's kind of hard to say what "a lot of" scratching is -what may seem like a lot to some, may turn out to be around normal amount of scratching to more experienced eyes. But based on what you described - losing fur around ears and back, progressing - likely mange). If you treat her for mange (and it's something else), it won't hurt her as long as you follow the dosage/administering instructions. But it does sound like mange.

    As for ivermectin - the dose above is paste,b/c only paste can be bought w/o prescription here, and "lay" people use that. Drops is a different story - I don't know how to dose drops on a nut b/c I never had access to drops.
    Besides, I think it is easier to dose paste on a nut, b/c you can make it stick, rather than a drop which can simply roll off.

    Re: paste - I've attached two pics. This is what a box generally looks like. Sometimes it may have a brand name of "Selamectin," "Biomectin" and anything else "-mectin," but then on the box it will say that it contains 1.87% Ivermectin.

    Make sure to follow all instructions carefully - when overdosed ivermectin can be fatal.
    And the course of treatment is important for it to be effective.
    Make sure that only she gets the medicated nut. If there is a risk that the juvies may intercept, there may be a risk that the same juvie will intercept again - which will be fatal.
    So, choose a moment/time when it is only she who will get the nut. Name:  42096_A.jpg
Views: 317
Size:  62.4 KBName:  ivermectin-feature-750x284-LRG-750x285.jpg
Views: 315
Size:  39.3 KB
    This information is really helpful. I'm so glad I asked about drops vs. paste!

    Thanks to the information you've provided, I now know exactly what to look for.

    I'm still trying to get some photos of her, but she's not having it at the moment. I've been observing her quite closely for about a year and she's had some periods of scratching, but nothing even remotely similar to this. She looks worse every day (more fur missing - especially near her ear on one side and on her lower back) & she's constantly scratching - even the area that's now a bald spot.

    Is it better to buy the paste that's apple flavoured?


    Does Ivermectin taste bad if it isn't flavoured?


    The squirrel in question is super picky and isn't going to eat anything that tastes bad/strange. She likes pecans, so there's no doubt she'll be happy to get that treat, but not if it tastes "off".

    I'm sure I'll have questions about how to administer it (dosage, etc.), but my first priority is to get the correct paste.

  12. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    N. America
    Posts
    8,108
    Thanked: 554

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by Ekorre View Post

    Is it better to buy the paste that's apple flavoured?


    Does Ivermectin taste bad if it isn't flavoured?
    Personally, I don't think that it makes much difference whether it is apple flavoured or non-flavoured because to a wild squirrel even that apple flavour is still a "fake," artificial flavour and isn't going to be all that appealing.

    To conceal the dose this is what I do:

    I use natural almond butter (that's what I have here, but any nut butter can be used).
    Once I lodge the dose in a nut groove, I use a teaspoon to pick up some nut butter - preferably more from the bottom - because in natural nut butters oil tends to accumulate on top even after stirring, and the bottom is usually drier than the top. So, I pick some from the bottom - the drier part. Doesn't need to be much - literally a couple of drops, then, I use my fingers to shape this drier butter into a little pancake-like something and then cover the dose with it, as you would with plasticine/clay/etc. Stick it firmly on the nut over the dose to cover the dose.

    If that sounds too elaborate - just use a little bit of nut butter to cover the dose (pick with a spoon and spread carefully over the dose avoiding accidentally removing the dose). Just try using the less oily portion of butter so that it does not just drip off dragging the med with it. Just use common sense - the goal is to cover the dose without ruining it. it is much easier than it may sound in a description. If you aren't sure - practice on a spare piece of nut.

    Once you cover it with nut butter, it will mask it enough for the squirrel not to smell the medicine.

    For dosage/administering, read this link https://thesquirrelboard.com/forums/...Wild-Squirrels

  13. 4 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to astra:

    Ekorre (03-22-2017), Mel1959 (03-21-2017), Nancy in New York (03-22-2017), squirrelgirl30 (06-26-2018)

  14. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    East coast of Florida
    Posts
    5,411
    Thanked: 7080

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by Ekorre View Post
    I really appreciate you taking the time to explain all of this, astra.

    To clarify: there are 3 squirrels that I feed on the roof below my kitchen window every day. One is the mother squirrel who has the issue with her fur (she's a year old). The other two are the babies (now juveniles) from her first litter who are 5-6 months old.

    When I said "younger squirrels" I was referring to the juveniles from her first litter, not the babies she's either just had (or is going to have if she's still pregnant).

    I've looked at photos of molt and mange (Google search) and I really don't think she's molting. I'm no expert, but that's my best guess based on what I've observed.

    Do squirrels who are molting scratch constantly?

    Her condition seems to be getting worse. She's scratched off all the fur near one of her ears and there are some small patches of fur missing on her lower back as well (they're all places she can reach with her claws).

    I don't want to treat her for mange if it's something else, but my best guess is that it's mange or dermatophytosis. Her itching like a maniac makes me think it's mange...but I can't be sure.

    I'll try to get some photos if possible, but she's super fast and I'm quite high up (I can't get close to where she is).

    If I do wind up treating her with Ivermectin, is it paste or drops that I need? I've only seen drops on eBay. Also, what percentage should the Ivermectin be? I see sellers on eBay advertising "0.5% Ivermectin drops" or "1% Ivermectin drops".

    Thanks again for your help with this!
    Quote Originally Posted by astra View Post
    Personally, I don't think that it makes much difference whether it is apple flavoured or non-flavoured because to a wild squirrel even that apple flavour is still a "fake," artificial flavour and isn't going to be all that appealing.

    To conceal the dose this is what I do:

    I use natural almond butter (that's what I have here, but any nut butter can be used).
    Once I lodge the dose in a nut groove, I use a teaspoon to pick up some nut butter - preferably more from the bottom - because in natural nut butters oil tends to accumulate on top even after stirring, and the bottom is usually drier than the top. So, I pick some from the bottom - the drier part. Doesn't need to be much - literally a couple of drops, then, I use my fingers to shape this drier butter into a little pancake-like something and then cover the dose with it, as you would with plasticine/clay/etc. Stick it firmly on the nut over the dose to cover the dose.

    If that sounds too elaborate - just use a little bit of nut butter to cover the dose (pick with a spoon and spread carefully over the dose avoiding accidentally removing the dose). Just try using the less oily portion of butter so that it does not just drip off dragging the med with it. Just use common sense - the goal is to cover the dose without ruining it. it is much easier than it may sound in a description. If you aren't sure - practice on a spare piece of nut.

    Once you cover it with nut butter, it will mask it enough for the squirrel not to smell the medicine.

    For dosage/administering, read this link https://thesquirrelboard.com/forums/...Wild-Squirrels
    This is very helpful advice Astra. . I'm sure Ekorre can help this poor little one, you did an awesome job explaining everything.

    I wanted to share that I purchase liquid Ivermectin from the feed store, without a prescription, to give to my dog for heart worm prevention. The product I have now goes by the trade name Ivermax and it's a 1% solution.

  15. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Mel1959:

    astra (03-27-2017), Ekorre (03-22-2017)

  16. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    215
    Thanked: 270

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by astra View Post
    Personally, I don't think that it makes much difference whether it is apple flavoured or non-flavoured because to a wild squirrel even that apple flavour is still a "fake," artificial flavour and isn't going to be all that appealing.

    To conceal the dose this is what I do:

    I use natural almond butter (that's what I have here, but any nut butter can be used).
    Once I lodge the dose in a nut groove, I use a teaspoon to pick up some nut butter - preferably more from the bottom - because in natural nut butters oil tends to accumulate on top even after stirring, and the bottom is usually drier than the top. So, I pick some from the bottom - the drier part. Doesn't need to be much - literally a couple of drops, then, I use my fingers to shape this drier butter into a little pancake-like something and then cover the dose with it, as you would with plasticine/clay/etc. Stick it firmly on the nut over the dose to cover the dose.

    If that sounds too elaborate - just use a little bit of nut butter to cover the dose (pick with a spoon and spread carefully over the dose avoiding accidentally removing the dose). Just try using the less oily portion of butter so that it does not just drip off dragging the med with it. Just use common sense - the goal is to cover the dose without ruining it. it is much easier than it may sound in a description. If you aren't sure - practice on a spare piece of nut.

    Once you cover it with nut butter, it will mask it enough for the squirrel not to smell the medicine.

    For dosage/administering, read this link https://thesquirrelboard.com/forums/...Wild-Squirrels
    Thank you SO much, Astra! Your clear instructions & the links you've provided have really made this easier on me.

    Based on what you've said, I think I'll buy the regular Ivermectin paste (not the flavoured one).

    I have almond butter, but I've never given it to her before. It's probably best to try that on a nut and see what she does before actually using the Ivermectin.

    The nut has to be thrown from rather high up and I know from experience that pecans often break when they hit the roof below. However, walnut halves rarely break - would it be okay to use a walnut instead of a pecan?

    I'll order the Ivermectin paste today.

    Your help has been/is invaluable and I'm very grateful to you for walking me through this.

    The last thing I want is to harm her or any of her young and I'm a bit nervous about it all.

  17. 4 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Ekorre:

    astra (03-27-2017), Mel1959 (03-22-2017), Nancy in New York (03-22-2017), squirrelgirl30 (06-26-2018)

  18. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    East coast of Florida
    Posts
    5,411
    Thanked: 7080

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    I'm sure it makes no difference whether it's a walnut or a pecan. Whichever will work best for you. My spoiled squees won't eat walnuts anymore....and will only take pecans if in the shell!! . Nice for you that you have options with your little girl.

  19. 3 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Mel1959:

    astra (03-22-2017), Ekorre (03-22-2017), Nancy in New York (03-22-2017)

  20. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    215
    Thanked: 270

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by Mel1959 View Post
    I'm sure it makes no difference whether it's a walnut or a pecan. Whichever will work best for you. My spoiled squees won't eat walnuts anymore....and will only take pecans if in the shell!! . Nice for you that you have options with your little girl.
    Thanks for chiming in, Mel1959. I need all the help/support I can get.

    I just saw this (it's from astra's thread about administering Ivermectin):

    "You can lodge the dose in the nut grooves - pecans and walnuts work well. personally, sometimes I ever so slightly carve a groove especially on a walnut. I noticed that squirrels tend no to eat the "peel" on walnuts (almonds and even hazelnuts sometimes) - you know, that brownish "skin" on the kernel. I saw often how they sort of "peel" it off and eat just the kernel. So, just in case, I remove that "skin/peel," carve slightly and put the dose."

    I'll definitely do this if I use a walnut.

    I've been feeding this girl since she was a few months old. She loves nuts (which I try to limit even though she's a wild squirrel), but can be quite picky about everything else. Oh, did you go out of your way to buy me those coconut chunks? Cauliflower? Mushrooms? Avocado? Broccoli? Those yummy organic apples and butternut squash? Well, I'll eat those healthy things if I feel like it. If not, I'll give you the squirrel stink eye.

    Yours sound like they know mom is: And really, what could be better than being owned by a squirrel (wild or otherwise)?

  21. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Ekorre:

    Mel1959 (03-22-2017), squirrelgirl30 (06-26-2018)

  22. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    215
    Thanked: 270

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by Mel1959 View Post
    This is very helpful advice Astra. . I'm sure Ekorre can help this poor little one, you did an awesome job explaining everything.

    I wanted to share that I purchase liquid Ivermectin from the feed store, without a prescription, to give to my dog for heart worm prevention. The product I have now goes by the trade name Ivermax and it's a 1% solution.
    Thanks for sharing this information. I'm adding everything to my "Ivermectin/Mange" file.

  23. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Ekorre from:

    Mel1959 (03-22-2017)

  24. #14
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    N. America
    Posts
    8,108
    Thanked: 554

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by Ekorre View Post

    The nut has to be thrown from rather high up and I know from experience that pecans often break when they hit the roof below. However, walnut halves rarely break - would it be okay to use a walnut instead of a pecan?.
    for squirrels - pecan or walnut, does not matter, they love them both.
    But if it is very high - do a few tests first, because there is a risk your nut piece splits, or the med falls out or something.
    If there is a way to minimize the distance/height as much as possible - that would be good. The possible problem with throwing a nut from a higher point - acceleration increases the impact, which means, the chances that the nut breaks are higher than if you tossed the same nut over horizontally (standing on the ground).

    So, do try different sizes of nut pieces. I think, a smaller piece has more chances of staying intact on impact than a larger one. And I think pecan pieces may withstand the impact better than walnuts, b/c pecan pieces are usually lighter in weight.
    But again - you need to practice first: toss pieces of different sizes and put nut butter on them as if to hide the medicine (sometimes, what happens - the nut flies in one direction, and the nut butter "cap" - in another, you don't need that).
    Practice everything well before throwing a nut to her.
    And, of course, think of all possible scenarios: if another squirrel intercepts a medicated nut and you want to try and throw another medicated nut - there should be a way to ensure that intercepter will not intercept again, or it will be fatal. If s/he keeps hanging around, maybe, it will be better to try another time when s/he won't be there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ekorre View Post
    Your help has been/is invaluable and I'm very grateful to you for walking me through this.
    My pleasure. Glad to help. I hope it will all work out for you.

  25. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to astra:

    Ekorre (03-25-2017), squirrelgirl30 (06-26-2018)

  26. #15
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    N. America
    Posts
    8,108
    Thanked: 554

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by Mel1959 View Post
    My spoiled squees won't eat walnuts anymore....and will only take pecans if in the shell!! .
    those are some majorly spoiled squees, indeed

  27. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    East coast of Florida
    Posts
    5,411
    Thanked: 7080

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by astra View Post
    those are some majorly spoiled squees, indeed
    They are incredibly spoiled!!

  28. Serious fuzzy thank you's to Mel1959 from:

    astra (03-26-2017)

  29. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    215
    Thanked: 270

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by astra View Post
    for squirrels - pecan or walnut, does not matter, they love them both.
    But if it is very high - do a few tests first, because there is a risk your nut piece splits, or the med falls out or something.
    If there is a way to minimize the distance/height as much as possible - that would be good. The possible problem with throwing a nut from a higher point - acceleration increases the impact, which means, the chances that the nut breaks are higher than if you tossed the same nut over horizontally (standing on the ground).

    So, do try different sizes of nut pieces. I think, a smaller piece has more chances of staying intact on impact than a larger one. And I think pecan pieces may withstand the impact better than walnuts, b/c pecan pieces are usually lighter in weight.
    But again - you need to practice first: toss pieces of different sizes and put nut butter on them as if to hide the medicine (sometimes, what happens - the nut flies in one direction, and the nut butter "cap" - in another, you don't need that).
    Practice everything well before throwing a nut to her.
    And, of course, think of all possible scenarios: if another squirrel intercepts a medicated nut and you want to try and throw another medicated nut - there should be a way to ensure that intercepter will not intercept again, or it will be fatal. If s/he keeps hanging around, maybe, it will be better to try another time when s/he won't be there.


    My pleasure. Glad to help. I hope it will all work out for you.
    Great advice, astra!

    I've been practising with different nuts & nut sizes. It's imperative that this goes smoothly and I'm acutely aware that there's no room for error.

    She loves the almond butter (no surprise there), so I've been able to get her to take some calcium carbonate. I know calcium carbonate has a completely neutral flavour (I don't need to mask the taste), but it often comes off the nuts I've dusted with it when they hit the roof below.

    In any case, the Ivermectin paste finally arrived today. Here's a photo of what I bought (they didn't have a smaller tube):

    Name:  IVERMECTIN PASTE.jpg
Views: 297
Size:  55.8 KB

    This is a photo taken from my kitchen window which shows the roof below (just to give you some idea of the height - the roof is actually a lot longer/bigger than it appears in the photo):

    Name:  ROOF PHOTO 2.jpg
Views: 294
Size:  97.9 KB

    I'll probably use a walnut as the pecans almost always break on impact. I'm not sure if today is the day - it will depend on what's going on out on the roof, etc. Did I mention that I also have to deal with pigeons and seagulls driving me (and the squirrels) crazy? Good times!

  30. #18
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    N. America
    Posts
    8,108
    Thanked: 554

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by Ekorre View Post
    Great advice, astra!

    I've been practising with different nuts & nut sizes. It's imperative that this goes smoothly and I'm acutely aware that there's no room for error.

    She loves the almond butter (no surprise there), so I've been able to get her to take some calcium carbonate. I know calcium carbonate has a completely neutral flavour (I don't need to mask the taste), but it often comes off the nuts I've dusted with it when they hit the roof below.

    In any case, the Ivermectin paste finally arrived today. Here's a photo of what I bought (they didn't have a smaller tube):

    This is a photo taken from my kitchen window which shows the roof below (just to give you some idea of the height - the roof is actually a lot longer/bigger than it appears in the photo):


    I'll probably use a walnut as the pecans almost always break on impact. I'm not sure if today is the day - it will depend on what's going on out on the roof, etc. Did I mention that I also have to deal with pigeons and seagulls driving me (and the squirrels) crazy? Good times!
    That paste looks good. I think they are all standard size, more or less. But that does not matter. Now you have plenty of ivermectin to treat lots of squirrels.

    Yes, definitely - keep practicing tossing nuts. That's a nice roof , it doesn't look overly high, so I think you should be able to find a nut half/piece that won't break.

    As for pigeons - I my Gosh, tell me about it! I used to have a major problem with them because they would literally devour all the almonds and other nut halves whole before any squirrel could get to them. A squirrel would be still gnawing on a nut, while pigeons were gobbling down almonds whole.
    Yep, they can be a problem. But there isn't much one can do unless you could hang bird feeders and such (but you'll have to be selective with bird feeders because some of the models aren't squirrel friendly and can be very dangerous (squirrel teeth can get caught, other body parts etc), so one has to be very careful selecting bird feeders if there are squirrels around.

    Good luck!!!
    Hope this can help your furry friend

  31. 3 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to astra:

    Ekorre (03-26-2017), Mel1959 (03-26-2017), Nancy in New York (03-26-2017)

  32. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    215
    Thanked: 270

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Quote Originally Posted by astra View Post
    That paste looks good. I think they are all standard size, more or less. But that does not matter. Now you have plenty of ivermectin to treat lots of squirrels.

    Yes, definitely - keep practicing tossing nuts. That's a nice roof , it doesn't look overly high, so I think you should be able to find a nut half/piece that won't break.

    As for pigeons - I my Gosh, tell me about it! I used to have a major problem with them because they would literally devour all the almonds and other nut halves whole before any squirrel could get to them. A squirrel would be still gnawing on a nut, while pigeons were gobbling down almonds whole.
    Yep, they can be a problem. But there isn't much one can do unless you could hang bird feeders and such (but you'll have to be selective with bird feeders because some of the models aren't squirrel friendly and can be very dangerous (squirrel teeth can get caught, other body parts etc), so one has to be very careful selecting bird feeders if there are squirrels around.

    Good luck!!!
    Hope this can help your furry friend
    Yes, I now have enough Ivermectin to treat an army of squirrels.

    Thanks again for all your help, support, and guidance!

    I decided to go for it yesterday (Saturday) as the conditions on the roof are never completely ideal (that's an understatement!) and she looked worse than ever. Poor thing!

    Long story short, I was able to get her to take the walnut with the almond butter and Ivermectin without any of it coming off the nut. I feel confident that she took the entire dose.

    The roof is higher than it looks (hard to get a decent photo with my mobile phone), but I managed.

    I know there are people who like pigeons, but I can't stand them. I'd never harm them, but they do drive me crazy on a daily basis. The squirrels are terrified of the pigeons and, like you said, they do their best to eat the nuts I put out for the squirrels!

    Fortunately, they can't eat walnut halves (they're too big for them) and they can only eat the pecans that break on impact. They can't eat the almonds and hazelnuts because they're in shells and they aren't interested in the vegetables or pieces of fruit.

    Seagulls are an entirely different story. They can (and do) eat just about anything I throw on the roof (except for the nuts in shells). I have a fairly high-powered water gun that I use on the birds (I'm sure my neighbours think I'm a lunatic). They don't like being sprayed with water and fly away...but they come back quickly.

    I was a nervous wreck waiting to see the squirrel I gave the Ivermectin to...so of course she showed up way later than usual today...right when I was on the verge of sheer panic...nearly convinced at that point that I had accidentally killed her (despite having read countless threads about mange, Ivermectin, etc...and staring at grains of rice until I was blind).

    And...she's completely fine! Healthy appetite, lots of energy, drank her water like usual. I, on the other hand, have aged at least 5 years since yesterday...

  33. 3 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to Ekorre:

    astra (03-26-2017), Mel1959 (03-26-2017), squirrelgirl30 (06-26-2018)

  34. #20
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    N. America
    Posts
    8,108
    Thanked: 554

    Default Re: Treating Mange: Wild Female Squirrel, Possibly Still Pregnant/Nursing Her Young

    Yay! Great job!

    I can totally relate to the nervous expectation of the treated squirrel , and how they will always show up later than usual just to keep one nervous a bit longer . And what a relief when they show up, like nothing happened, full of energy as usual.
    So, now you have a min. of 7 days of reprieve. And then - again.

    I am sure seagulls eat everything, I had a couple once in a while, but not a lot b/c I wasn't close enough to the water.

    But, pigeons and seagulls are people, too .

    Maybe, you could sprinkle some bird food on that roof to distract them from the nuts for squirrels?
    Although I am not sure that would be a good idea - bc that may mean that you will end up with a permanent bird buffet and lots and lots of birds. Your neighbours may not find that interesting.
    Some of the squirrels I had on my deck were, actually, lunging at some pigeons , but those were what you'd call Alpha-type. THe rest - just shared a nut pile with them (and like I described: pigeons would be swallowing nuts while a squirrel was still working on one kernel).

    Anyhoo, the treatment started! And started successfully!
    Hopefully, it will help her.

  35. 2 TSBers pass along the fuzzy thanks to astra:

    Ekorre (03-28-2017), Mel1959 (03-26-2017)

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •