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Thread: Questions about MRSA

  1. #1
    mpetys Guest

    Default Questions about MRSA

    Hi everyone. This may not be the right place to post this since I am the one with MRSA but the question is about my squirrels so I thought I would maybe get better response here instead of OFF Topic.

    One of my squirrels bit me the other day. Bit me on the finger. She is one that will be released in the springtime. I've been bit many times before, sometimes my fault, sometimes accident such as squirrel was really trying to grab the nut in my hand or sometimes the three that are housed together just get into this mob mentality and in the excitement I get bit. This time, one of them was running around and didn't want to be caught and put up. She bit . . OUCH!

    I didn't think much of it until I noticed that my wounds were not responding to the neosporin like they usually do. My finger was extremely swollen, tight, could not bend and the wounds were turning black with pus coming out. At this same time, I developed some kind of infection in my gums. Felt like a toothache came on all of a sudden. Dreading going to the dentist so tried to doctor it with ambesol and pain medications that I had on hand. Nothing, got so bad that I actually rubbed BenGay into my face from the jawline to the cheekbone.

    Anyhow went to my family dr. and he gave me script for antibiotics (Cephalexin) and took a sample to send to the lab to make sure this was the right antibiotic. He also gave me samples of a medication called Vimovo to reduce the swelling and help with the pain. He said that the infection in the gums could be related to the infection in the finger as it travels through the bloodstream. Within a couple of hours of taking the first dose of the Vimovo, my gums had quit hurting so bad and the swelling in my finger went down and I could bend my finger. Today, my doctors office called to say the lab report came back and I have MRSA. They called in a script for doxycycline, which I picked up this evening.

    I have rheumatoid arthritis, an auto-immune disorder, so my immune system is weakened already. I am on two medications which suppress the immune system even more. One is a once a month IV medication called Orencia and the other I take once a week called Methotrexate. I have had problems in the past with wounds not healing and if I get a cold, it usually takes me 2 or 3 times longer to get over it than everyone else.

    Now to my questions. While it is possible that I picked this up from somewhere while I had this open wound on my finger; is there a chance that the squirrel(s) may have given it to me. I mean, could one or more of them be a carrier. I know in humans, 1% of people can be carriers of MRSA, never getting rid of it but having recurring problems.

    The squirrels are all healthy having never shown any problems. Can I give it to them?

    Sorry this post is so long. I just want to get rid of the MRSA and keep anyone else from getting it from me if that is possible.

    Thanks for any info and advice.

    Michele

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    wow... three threads concerning mrsa.....

    mpetys first of all it sounds horrific what you've gone through and i cannot even guess what is the cause....

    i'm only adding these other two threads because some research is showing that cranberries are very effective for some mrsas ... and it looks like squirrels respond to them too....

    so this is just for your info.....



    http://www.thesquirrelboard.com/foru...ht=cranberries


    http://www.thesquirrelboard.com/foru...ad.php?t=26235

    Silvana..

    *************************************

    tip for flyer parents.... Flying Squirrels need meat every single day (mealworms/waxworms/cooked chicken breast)

  3. #3
    mpetys Guest

    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    Thanks gs1, I had read those threads and stocked up on cranberries for the squirrels but didn't think about cranberry juice for me. I have never eaten a plain cranberry before but I guess if I dipped them in chocolate or nutella they can't be too bad, right!

    Michele

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    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    hi Michele,

    I know nothing about MRSA (no, actually, just by going through those post I am beginning to learn something;-)), but if cranberries are helpful against it, that's great. Eating them whole can certainly be a challenge, but here are two things you could try:

    One thing you could do with them is to wash a handful, pop them with your fingers (so that they pop, crack), pour boiling water, cover and let it sit till it gets to room temp (or drinkable temp) - ready to drink. It will be tart, so you can add a sweetener if you want to (but I like the tartness). The berries themselves will be moushy, but almost not tart. Again, you can mix them with honey or something, or yogurt, or smth like that.

    Although, it might be a good idea to drink this first thing in the morning on an empty stomach and eat the berries, too, without anything added, because that way there won't be anything else to slow down/interfere with their action. Just consider them a medicine and eat it. Eventually, you'll get used to the taste. ;-) And then, drink it throughout the day, too.
    I also find that their tartness suppresses my appetite (a nice bonus;-)), at least somewhat.
    This 'cranberry tea" drink is great when cooled, too - very refreshing.

    Another thing you could do is mash the berries with, say, honey, or some other sweetener (food processor or something like that). The ratio should be to taste, so you will need to find how much honey you want in it, just keep adding and tasting.
    Once this 'jam' mixture is ready, you can keep it in the fridge for quite some time. Again, you can take a tbsp or two of it in the morning first thing, or with tea etc. (and eat throughout the day, too).

    if they are good against MRSA, that's great, because they are very good for many other reasons. So, you'll be reaping multiple bonuses along the way ;-)

    P.S. most of natural medicinal remedies like these are also good to eat 2-3 hrs after last meal before bed.

  5. #5
    Kristal Guest

    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    Yikes, what an ordeal I have no advice, but you have my sympathies...

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    Michele-Cranberries can be bitter and to get the dose you need will be a lot of them to down. Best to go to a health food store and buy the capsules. Follow the direction on the bottle. They aren't cheap but this is the best way to get what you need. You will be surprised at other things are helped a lot by the cranberries
    Anne
    Wildlife and Squirrel Rescue,Inc.
    Rescuing Fl squirrels since 1979
    Moderator: NFSA Emergency Care
    Wildlife Intake Coordinator and Rehab Consultant at "The Ark Wildlife Care and Sanctuary Inc"
    http://www.thearkwildlifecareandsanctuary.com/

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    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    mpetys, I'm sorry to hear about the bite and MRSA. I don't know of any precedents for receiving MRSA from a squirrel bite, but a squirrel bite was suspected in a case of a person developing skin legions from fungus (Sporothrix schenckii). I'm not sure if that's helpful, though.

    At any rate, I hope your finger continues to improve, mpetys.
    Last edited by island rehabber; 12-18-2010 at 08:06 AM.
    "[T]his is a lovely world, but not an easy one." - Salten
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    Be advised, I'm neither a rehabber nor a wildlife biologist, so don't trust me with anything important.

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    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    Most of the time, the MRSA bacteria is on the skin surface, unable to do anything - it is present in the environment and can come from any contact. It just needs a way in. A squirrel tooth puncturing the underlying skin would do it. As would an entry cut by ANYTHING. We have another member her who got it from an injection of corticosteroid. I second the cranberry PILLS BTW - I take them for UTIs.

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    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    Sending some HEALING Thoughts & Prayers --Long Distance...
    The KING COMMANDS You to Get Better
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  10. #10
    mugzeezma Guest

    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    What is MSRA?

    http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/oids/epi/di...erinarians.pdf

    MRSA Information for Veterinarians
    MRSA stands for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. It is a type of bacteria that is resistant to certain antibiotics, most commonly methicillin. However, oxacillin, penicillin and amoxicillin are included.
    Hospital acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) infections are considered nosocomial infections. MRSA infections that are acquired by individuals who have not been recently hospitalized (within the last year), or have not had any medical procedures completed are known as community acquired (CA-MRSA). In 2003, 63% of MRSA cases were hospital acquired; CA-MRSA is less common but can be more virulent. Over 1,400 MRSA isolates have been identified. The majority of these isolates comprise 11 clonal groups, five hospital acquired (HA) and six community acquired (CA).

    How common is MRSA?
    Up to 30% of humans are colonized by Staphylococcus aureus but only a minority of these S. aureus strains is methicillin resistant. Most surveys estimate that less than 1% of the general population and up to 5-10% of healthcare workers carry MRSA. Recent reports suggest that up to 10% of veterinary staff members are colonized with MRSA.
    The incidence in companion animals is largely unknown. Small scale, referral hospital based studies suggest that up to 10% of dogs may carry MRSA and approximately 3% of recent submissions to veterinary laboratories have involved MRSA. In contrast, other studies have identified methicillin resistance in staphylococci from 15% of healthy cats and 38% of dogs with recurrent pyoderma. Recent studies have also concluded that MRSA infections are becoming an emerging problem in equine populations.

    How is MRSA transmitted?
    The main mode of transmission for MRSA is via hands which may become contaminated by contact with a) colonized or infected individuals (or animals), b) colonized or infected body sites of other individuals, or c) contaminated devices, items or environmental surfaces.

    Can MRSA be transmitted from animals to humans and from humans to animals?
    Yes. Staphylococcus aureus and other Staphylococcus bacteria can opportunistically cross species barriers under certain circumstances.

    Who is at risk to acquire MRSA?
    Health care workers are at the highest risk of becoming colonized with MRSA. 63% of infections with MRSA are categorized as HA-MRSA cases. The remaining cases are split between healthy individuals who acquire the bacteria through their everyday
    environment and individuals involved in the animal industry, most commonly those involved in the veterinary field. Individuals who are immunocompromised, or those with skin and/or mucosal barrier defects are at a greater risk of colonization and infection. Animals at risk include those from known MRSA positive households or that belong to healthcare workers. A substantial proportion of animal cases have indirect or direct contact with human healthcare environments, although this has not been noted in the majority of cases reported recently.

    What are the clinical signs of MRSA infections?
    It is possible to have asymptomatic carriers. The prevalence as well as risk factors for carriage of MRSA in healthy dogs and cats is unknown. At present, MRSA infections should be suspected in:
     Necrotic lesions of the skin and soft tissue
     Patients with non-healing wounds
     Patients with non-antibiotic responsive infections where previous cytology and/or
    culture indicates that staphylococci are involved
     Nosocomial or secondary infections, especially in at-risk patients. At-risk patients
    include immuno-compromised animals, long-term hospitalized cases, patients with widespread skin and/or mucosal defects, and surgical cases, especially those undergoing invasive procedures and/or those with implants
     Animals dying of sepsis or other invasive infections

    How do I diagnose a suspected MRSA case?
    It is best to obtain a culture or biopsy from the infected site and submit the sample to a microbiology laboratory. Appropriate samples include:
     Skin Infection: Obtain either a small biopsy of skin or drainage from the infected site. A culture of a skin lesion is especially useful in recurrent or persistent cases of skin infection, in cases of antibiotic failure, and in cases that present with advanced or aggressive infections.
     Pneumonia: Obtain a sputum culture (expectorated purulent sputum, respiratory lavage, or bronchoscopy).
     Bloodstream Infection: Obtain blood cultures using aseptic techniques & blood culture bottle.
     Urinary Infection: Obtain urine cultures using aseptic techniques. Check with your local laboratory for advice on specimen type, collection and transport if you are unsure. Samples for bacterial culture should be submitted to a microbiology laboratory able to identify MRSA as soon as possible. All samples and bodies sent for post-mortem examination should be packaged securely in a sealed container. A form outside the sealed container should state clearly that MRSA is suspected.

    What is the treatment for MRSA?
    The significance of MRSA colonization or infection varies from case to case. Most strains are treatable readily with non beta lactam class (penicillins or cefalosporins) antibiotics. Veterinary isolates are usually sensitive to routine antibiotics including
    potentiated sulfona-mides, tetracyclines, fusidic acid and mupirocin, although these may not licensed for use in animals. The choice of antimicrobials for treatment should be determined by culture-based antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Further treatment depends on the nature of the primary problem and may require specialist advice.

    When is treatment for MRSA indicated in a pet?
    If your patient is diagnosed with MRSA infection (as described above), treatment is warranted. If your patient is only colonized with MRSA, the need for treatment should be considered on a case-by-case basis. Some pets are colonized from contact with humans infected or colonized with MRSA and have been documented as clearing the colonization without treatment when separated from the household while the humans were being treated. For pet owners who are immunocompromised or those with skin and/or mucosal barrier defects are at a greater risk of colonization or infection due to exposure to a MRSA colonized pet; therefore treatment to clear MRSA colonization in these pets should be considered and discussed with a veterinary specialist.

    For more information on treatment of MRSA, please visit Centers for Disease Control & Prevention website on MRSA: http://www.cdc.gov/mrsa. While this website includes information on treatment of humans, due to the currently limited information on treatment of MRSA of animals, the algorithm of treatment of human MRSA cases may be helpful for veterinarians.

  11. #11
    mugzeezma Guest

    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    What measures of protection should be taken in the veterinary setting?
    Small and large animal veterinary personnel are a high-risk population for acquiring and transmitting MRSA. MRSA has been documented in dogs, cats, and horses, with MRSA cases also documented in small animal and equine veterinary staff. Screening hospitalized cases during their stay and/or prior to discharge may be necessary in an environment where MRSA is endemic and/or there is circumstantial evidence of transmission in the practice.
    Veterinary clinic staff precautions when handling MRSA suspect patients:
     Wash and disinfect hands between patients.
     Wear uniforms/coats that can be laundered/disposed of on site.
     Wear gloves and disposable aprons during direct contact with patients, body
    fluids, lesions and other contaminated materials. Face protection must be worn if
    there is potential for aerosols to form.
     Long hair should be tied back and covered with a disposable surgeonís cap.
     Staff with open lesions or who are immunocompromised should avoid handling
    an MRSA patient.
    Hospitalization of a MRSA patient:
     Isolation of patients with/suspect MRSA is necessary from admission to discharge.
     Movement of a MRSA infected patient around the practice and procedures involving patient should be kept to a minimum.
     Patients must be designated to isolation wards if possible, if not, as far removed from other patients as possible.
     MRSA infected wounds should be covered with impermeable dressing.  All items used for the care of the patient must be designated to that patient for the
    duration of care. They must be disposed of, or sterilized between patients.
    (Examples include leashes, bowls, Elizabethan collars)
     Sterilization of all equipment, instruments, etc must be completed between
    patients.
     Bedding should be disposed of, or if not possible, laundered in hot bleach water
    and dried in the dryer on high in order to kill the bacteria
     Cage and immediate floor environment should be cleaned and disinfected at least
    one time daily.
     Designate specific staff per shift to be responsible and knowledgeable caretaker(s)
    of patient.
     Limit staff interaction with patient.
     Owners should be discouraged from visiting the hospitalized pet. It is essentialthat they are educated on the risks involved, and wear protective clothing.
     If surgery is necessary, it may be possible to decontaminate the patient by bathing
    with an antibacterial shampoo, covering lesions with impermeable dressings, and cleaning lesion and/or surgical sites with 70% alcohol. If the animal is MRSA positive on intra-nasal culture, intra-nasal antibacterials such as chlorhexidine, neomycin or mupirocin may also reduce the risk of colonizing the surgical site.
    What is the appropriate way to discharge a MRSA patient?
     At discharge, wounds should be covered with impermeable dressing.  When possible, schedule discharge towards end of the day in order to decrease
    contact risk with other patients in the hospital  Segregation of all waste and appropriate hazardous waste disposal within the
    veterinary clinicís standard operation procedures must be followed.  The patient should be cultured prior to discharge to identify persistent
    colonization. If the animal remains colonized, the potential risks and precautions that should be taken must be discussed with the owner. They should sign an acknowledgement prior to discharge.
     It is important that the owner is informed of the risks. They should wear gloves when changing bandages or cleaning wounds and always wash their hands or use alcohol sanitizers after coming into contact with their pet. Any one sick or immunocompromised in the home should not have contact with the pet. The area where the animal is kept should be cleaned with a 10% solution of bleach water.

    What if a MRSA patient dies?
    If an MRSA positive animal dies, all lesions and body orifices should be covered. The body should be placed in a sealed, impervious bag as soon as possible and be disposed of by cremation.

    Zoonotic potential in the Veterinary Work Place:
    Because veterinary practices are environments in which humans and ill animals are in close contact, the risk of zoonotic transmission is elevated.

    The Veterinary Infection Control Committee (VICC) of the National Association of State Public Health

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    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    Great information Mugz! Thanks for posting it.

    Michele, I sure hope your finger gets better soon.

  13. #13
    mpetys Guest

    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    Ok, I went to the health food store and got my cranberry pills. I also got cranberry juice and a cranberry probiotic smoothie! They also had cranberry concentrate. You can add a measured amount to a glass of water and add sweetener if you like. So I am prepared.

    Thanks everyone for your good advice and information. I think I was freaking out cause I had a friend that died from a MRSA infection. She got hers when she was in the hospital for surgery. Never made it home.

    Michele

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    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    Michele, glad you got all your supplies. My nephew got MRSA while in the hospital, and it took a while, but he recovered. I think if you're in good health otherwise, you're probably fine. Your body should be able to fight it with some good immune boosters. Hope you heal up great. Many prayers coming your way

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    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    Thanks, Mugzeezma,

    That's one very comprehensive informative posting.!

  16. #16
    mpetys Guest

    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    I've been doing a lot of reading about MRSA. When I find something interesting or possibly helpful to others I will post a link in this thread.

    I just read an article from the UK Daily Mail titled, Cooking herb Thyme 'could stop spread of MRSA'. Researchers at the University of Brighton, East Sussex, discovered that oils extracted from the plant can kill the bug - linked to at least 8,000 deaths each year - within two hours.

    One of the readers posted this comment:
    This is nothing new. In the 30ies, in France at least and a good part of Southern Europe, essentials oils was widely used in hospitals and war fronts to establish septicemia and prevent gangren. It has been since the invention of antibiotics that essential oils have been forgotten. But it is widely known that thym, origanum, clove, eucalyptus are very effective against all germs (including fungi, positive and negative gram bacteria). As well is iodine.... There is absolutely nothing new in this. People interested migh look for the work of Jean VALNET, Pierre FRANCHOMME. The only problem with essential oils is that they cannot be patented.


    Here is the link if you would like to read this article:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...read-MRSA.html

    Michele

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    Quote Originally Posted by mpetys
    I've been doing a lot of reading about MRSA. When I find something interesting or possibly helpful to others I will post a link in this thread.

    I just read an article from the UK Daily Mail titled, Cooking herb Thyme 'could stop spread of MRSA'. Researchers at the University of Brighton, East Sussex, discovered that oils extracted from the plant can kill the bug - linked to at least 8,000 deaths each year - within two hours.

    One of the readers posted this comment:
    This is nothing new. In the 30ies, in France at least and a good part of Southern Europe, essentials oils was widely used in hospitals and war fronts to establish septicemia and prevent gangren. It has been since the invention of antibiotics that essential oils have been forgotten. But it is widely known that thym, origanum, clove, eucalyptus are very effective against all germs (including fungi, positive and negative gram bacteria). As well is iodine.... There is absolutely nothing new in this. People interested migh look for the work of Jean VALNET, Pierre FRANCHOMME. The only problem with essential oils is that they cannot be patented.


    Here is the link if you would like to read this article:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...read-MRSA.html

    Michele
    Thanks, Michele,

    I totally agree with this not because I read about it, too (although, I did;-)), but because I personally recovered from a few issues without using any 'patented' meds, but herbal, naturopathic and essential oils remedies.
    They work. And yes, because they cannot be patented, they don't present a source of profit, moreover, they pose a threat to the 'patented' stuff, so...

    However, I would like to note, that individual cases vary, and sometimes, in especially severe cases, these remedies should not replace regular meds. But they can be a great and potent supplement, often sort of 'helping' the prescribed meds do their job.

    yes, I can testify that such remedies can work miracles!

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    So sorry to hear that you acquired MRSA--from whatever source. Good news is that is seems to be improving. I, too, believe in natural remedies, but encourage you to combine them with "patented" meds in this case. MRSA is, as you said, a scary condition. Not only have I, too, had a friend die from it, but have actually had and overcome MRSA...mine was hospital acquired and took several medications to completely cure. It also was a strain that stayed with me for over a year, despite the meds.

    Please be sure to have your blood checked until it is completely clean and don't hesitate to consult an infectious disease specialist if necessary. You may also want to know that your blood SED rate may be permanently elevated from this condition...mine is almost triple what is considered normal for an adult, although no infection persists.

    Keeping you in thoughts and prayers and glad you were able to be diagnosed and treated quickly!

  19. #19
    mugzeezma Guest

    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    Quote Originally Posted by astra
    Thanks, Michele,

    I totally agree with this not because I read about it, too (although, I did;-)), but because I personally recovered from a few issues without using any 'patented' meds, but herbal, naturopathic and essential oils remedies.
    They work. And yes, because they cannot be patented, they don't present a source of profit, moreover, they pose a threat to the 'patented' stuff, so...

    However, I would like to note, that individual cases vary, and sometimes, in especially severe cases, these remedies should not replace regular meds. But they can be a great and potent supplement, often sort of 'helping' the prescribed meds do their job.

    yes, I can testify that such remedies can work miracles!
    Astra ...
    You should be our go to education girl for herbal and homeopathic!
    Do you have time to put something together for sticky?

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    Default Re: Questions about MRSA

    Quote Originally Posted by mugzeezma
    Astra ...
    You should be our go to education girl for herbal and homeopathic!
    Do you have time to put something together for sticky?
    Hi Mugzeezma,

    I will be happy to share what I've learned. However, not right now, but sometime in the Spring (too much stuff going on right now).
    I will put a few things together, and if people think it is important enough, it can be turned into a sticky.

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